TV ratingzzz

First Place NBC, with a rare Wednesday night win to go along with expected Thursday and Saturday night victories, took Week 11 of the new season with a 16.9 Nielsen rating and a 26 percent audience share, compared with CBS' 16.3/25 and ABC's 14.4/22 . . .

CBS took Friday and Sunday night, ABC took Monday and Tuesday. The Wednesday win, despite the presence of "Dynasty," marked the first time NBC had won that night when regular series were competing since the week of Dec. 29, 1981 . . .

"Dynasty II: The Colbys," which did poorly in its regular time slot debut the previous week (on low-viewership Thanksgiving), rose from 50th to 40th . . .

That dull performance, plus the fact that last season's one-two finishers, "Dynasty" and "Dallas," were slightly off the pace again this week, lends credence to the theory that nighttime soaps may finally be slipping in popularity . . .

Speaking of slippage, "John & Yoko: A Love Story" on NBC was 50th and CBS' "Copacabana," starring Barry Manilow, tied for 55th . . .

Rounding out the Final and for Three of Them Already Fatal Five last week were, in order, one too many reruns of "Victor/Victoria" on CBS, in 68th place, followed by CBS' canceled "George Burns Comedy Week," ABC's "Ripley's Believe It or Not" (due to depart early next year), ABC's "Shadow Chasers" and ABC's canceled "Our Family Honor," which finished in 72nd and last place for the week ending Dec. 8 . . . Also in the News

Walter H. and Phyllis J. Shorenstein have given $5 million to Harvard University for a new Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, to be established at the university's John F. Kennedy School of Government . . .

The gift honors the memory of their daughter Joan Shorenstein Barone, who died in March of cancer. A former producer of CBS' "Face the Nation" and a former member of the Washington Post staff, Mrs. Barone was a producer of "The CBS Evening News" in Washington when she died. The center will be named the Joan Shorenstein Barone Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy . . .

Walter Shorenstein is a San Francisco real estate magnate and philanthropist who is also prominent in national Democratic Party circles . . .

The center, which will be formally established next year with an endowment of approximately $10 million, is designed "to develop greater knowledge about the impact of the media on government and of public policies on a free press," according to the university . . .

Shorenstein said, "My wife and I, and our son Douglas and daughter Carole, are very happy that a way has been found to celebrate our daughter's and sister's memory in an enduring manner which will so meaningfully express her ideals about the practice of both journalism and politics" . . .

In its announcement yesterday, the university said Walter Shorenstein was encouraged to consider the gift by Sen. Edward Kennedy, a member of the senior advisory committee, and by others who knew Mrs. Barone, including Dan Rather of CBS News, David Broder of The Washington Post and Albert Hunt of The Wall Street Journal . . .

"The gift is a wonderful thing," Mrs. Barone's husband, Michael Barone, who survives with daughter Sarah, said yesterday. Barone is a Washington Post editorial writer. In Other News

A strong sign that a new series is headed NBC's way is the announcement yesterday that a two-hour pilot, called "Blacke's Magic," will air on the network Jan. 5 . . .

The series, which has been in the wings for some time, stars Hal Linden as a "retired illusionist" who solves "impossible crimes" with the help of his dad, played by Harry Morgan . . .

Channel 5 announced yesterday it will air a controversial BBC documentary, "The Last Days of Marilyn Monroe," the night of Feb. 19 . . .

The 90-minute program is based on "Goddess: The Secret Lives of Marilyn Monroe," written by British author Anthony Summers. The book suggests romantic entanglements of the late actress with both President John F. Kennedy and his brother Robert F. Kennedy as well as mob surveillance of Monroe . . .

The bestselling book also served as a basis for an ABC "20/20" investigation last summer. A lengthy segment on the subject was canceled by ABC News President Roone Arledge shortly before an Oct. 3 air date because, he said at the time, he was not satisfied that the allegations had been proved . . .

Education Secretary William J. Bennett managed to enliven one of those well-intentioned but usually little-remarked promotion campaign announcements on the Hill yesterday . . .

Executives of ABC and the Public Broadcasting Service were at the Library of Congress to launch a joint drive against adult illiteracy by the two networks when Bennett's opening remarks included a warning to parents that "television can also be a diversion from reading . . . the leisure time spent watching television can't be spent doing things, like reading, that are more conducive to academic achievement" . . .

James E. Duffy, president of communications for American Broadcasting Cos., responded by saying "there is no real evidence to show that television is part of the problem . . . I don't take too much credence in that statement" . . .

Bruce Christensen, president of PBS, pointed out that "it's television that's recognizing that there is a problem . . . I don't think that the finger-pointing solves any problems" . . .

ABC confirmed that a network executive tried, obviously without success, to get Bennett to tone down his remarks after first seeing his prepared statement on Monday night . . .

As part of the illiteracy drive, ABC News will air a documentary next September on the problems of the estimated 23 million functionally illiterate adult Americans. Immediately after the ABC show, PBS will broadcast a documentary on strategies to combat illiteracy . . .

Both ABC and PBS will also air public-service announcements on illiteracy and spotlight the campaign in news and public affairs shows. ABC is also planning an "Afterschool Special" on the subject and PBS will run a series called "The American Ticket" now under development. In addition, a new group called the Public Television Outreach Alliance, which includes WETA here, will help organize seminars and workshops around the country to train community task forces to respond to the national broadcasts . . .