Virginia Freeman hosted the party for her husband, Carl, that was mentioned in yesterday's Personalities column.

Patti Davis, the daughter of President and Nancy Reagan, has been named by Ms. magazine as one of its 12 "Women of the Year." The magazine picked Davis "for retaining her own identity despite pressures of being a president's daughter and for writing honestly about honoring our families and principles at the same time." She certainly has been independent and has made very few Washington appearances since her parents have been in the White House.

This is the third group of women selected by Ms. magazine since it started the awards in response to Time magazine's "Man of the Year" issues. The women are chosen "for creating new standards of excellence in their work and their lives," editor Gloria Steinem said. Among the dozen women named was comedian Lily Tomlin "for making ordinary women into stars and vice versa" and Harlem Globetrotter Lynette Woodward "for challenging popular stereotypes of skill and strength." Farewell to Herb's

It was only there for about three years, but for many people Herb's Restaurant, in a hotel on P Street NW near Dupont Circle, became a landmark of sorts with its gleeming black statues of nude women. Today that comes to an end when the sign comes down as part of the renovation of the hotel now owned by Omni International, and tonight will be the night for one last drink at Herb's. The statues, the property of the former owner of the hotel, have already been moved. In the spring, the hotel will open the Cafe' Beaux Arts where Herb's was. Known for several years as the Georgetown Hotel, even though it isn't all that close to Georgetown, the hotel will be renamed the Omni Georgetown Hotel.

One of the two big eagles on the top of the hotel will be given to Eagle Elementary School in Eagle, Wis., a small town about 30 miles west of Milwaukee. It hasn't been decided yet where the other eagle will go. One possibility is American University, where the school's symbol is the eagle.

The elementary school children in Eagle produced a successful letter-writing campaign to get the 7-foot-tall eagle, which will be housed in the foyer of the school's new building. Richard Cotter, the general manager of the hotel here, will personally present the eagle in Eagle today. Sen. William Proxmire, who is usually better behaved, crawled into the crate that will carry the eagle to his home state of Wisconsin and kissed it goodbye Monday. But then kissing a metal eagle is better than kissing a baby. End Notes

Robert Redford and Meryl Streep weren't there, but then they hadn't been expected at last night's benefit film premiere of "Out of Africa" at the Uptown Theatre. Jean Kennedy Smith and Ambassador of Denmark and Mrs. Eigil Jorgensen hosted the benefit for Very Special Arts, formally called the National Committee, Arts for the Handicapped, which is affiliated with the Kennedy Center. The organization encourages people with disabilities to develop their talents and express themselves creatively through the arts. The evening also included a Danish Christmas supper at the Danish Embassy. The guest list included actress Karen Akers; Sens. Nancy Kassebaum, Strom Thurmond and John Warner; Ethel Kennedy; and George Stevens Jr., head of the American Film Institute . . .

Margaret Heckler, the former secretary of health and human services, was sworn in yesterday as ambassador to Ireland in the Benjamin Franklin room of the State Department. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor swore Heckler in. Vice President George Bush and Secretary of State George Shultz were there . . .

When an arts patron has a birthday, the Washington Opera knows how to celebrate it in style. Carl M. Freeman, the wealthy real estate investor who is vice president of the Opera's board of trustees, celebrated his 75th birthday Tuesday night at the Woodmont Country Club and he was serenaded by no less a talent than Mstislav Rostropovich on the cello and opera singer Faith Esham, who sang from works by Puccini. As another arts patron, David Lloyd Kreeger, said, there are two phenomena that come around every 75 years: Halley's comet and Carl Freeman . . .