Bits and pieces as 1985 draws to a close:

If he cares about such things, 1985 was a better year than Chinese leader Deng Xiaoping realized. Not only was he saluted as Time magazine's Man of the Year, he is Success! magazine's "Success Story of the Year for 1985." In the magazine that celebrates capitalism, it probably isn't astonishing that Deng would be chosen, since the editor said he was selected "because his perseverance, courage and promotion of free enterprise make him a universal role model." In the article written by Pulitzer Prize-winning former New York Times correspondent Harrison E. Salisbury, Deng is saluted for putting China "on a new and successful fast track." They must have some inside information at Success! Last year the magazine honored Peter Ueberroth, who was also Time's Man of the Year . . .

It was close, but Christie Brinkley came through before the end of the year. Singer-songwriter Billy Joel's "uptown girl" gave birth late Sunday night to a 6 1/2-pound baby girl at an undisclosed Manhattan hospital, just in time for a healthy 1985 income tax deduction. Supermodel Brinkley, 32, and Joel, 36, were married last March. The baby is as yet unnamed . . .

It's always surprising to be reminded that in 1985, in some circles, young women still are introduced to society. Lucinda Desha Robb, the daughter of Virginia Gov. Charles Robb and Lynda Johnson Robb, made her social debut this weekend at New York's 31st Annual International Debutante Ball in the Waldorf-Astoria Ballroom. Her parents watched from a box overlooking the ballroom as Lucinda joined 47 other young women from across the United States and several other countries . . .

Georgetown University is a major academic institution. Unfortunately there, as at so many lesser colleges and universities, it is a fact that college sports pay off. The current Regardie's magazine reports that Georgetown took in $12 million in profits during the four years Patrick Ewing played basketball there. Not only did game attendance nearly triple over the pre-Ewing years (adding nearly $4.5 million in revenue), the magazine reports, but TV earnings were up nearly $2 million and alumni contributions increased significantly. There has even been an increase in applications for admission to Georgetown since the Hoyas' appearance in the 1982 NCAA championship game. Some professors probably thought all the interest was because the students had heard about the law school or the foreign service studies program. Alas! Who needs to boast about academics to attract students when some ball handler can do that for you? . . .

A little bit of charity work and good public relations advice can do wonders. British radio listeners have named Princess Anne Woman of the Year for 1985. This is the same princess who was once tagged the haughtiest and least popular member of Britain's royal family. As president of the Save the Children Fund, she visited India and Bangladesh this year and toured four African countries. To win the title, she edged out Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and South African black nationalist Winnie Mandela. The vote was organized by the British Broadcasting Corp.'s "Today" program . . .

And 1985 could not end without one more list. The Washington Hairdressers and Cosmetologists Association of the District of Columbia has named "The 10 Best Coiffed Women in Washington": Washington's first lady Effi Barry; American University's first lady Gail Berendzen; singer Lena Horne; socialites Lacey Neuhaus, who is becoming more visible around town again, and Helga Orfila, the new businesswoman; First Lady Nancy Reagan; television reporter Andrea Roane; boutique owner Linda Spano; television newswoman Lesley Stahl; and emerging Washington personality and sometime model Shari Theismann . . .