It's no secret that fallen Redskins quarterback Joe Theismann is angry that the sportswriters, the fans and even his ex-wife have buried his career. Broken leg aside, Theismann keeps telling everyone he talks to that he'll be back next season. And ever the businessman, Theismann has found a way to be paid for answering his critics.

A full-page ad in the recent Sports Illustrated magazine, with a stern-looking Theismann glaring from the page, is headlined: "They're Dead Wrong." In the text of the ad for the Tennis Corp. of America, Theismann argues: "Nobody tells me when my career is over. The doctors may mumble, the competition may hope, but I'll decide. You'll see number 7 calling plays when next season opens." In the meantime, Theismann says, he'll be working out at one of the clubs that are sponsoring the ad.

A similar ad with the same picture appeared in yesterday's Chicago Tribune. This one bears the headline "They'll Have to Break Both Legs," with text advertising the Chicago Health & Racquetball Club, where Theismann says he'll be getting back in shape. If you work out there you might just run into him. Come autumn, we'll see if Joe lives up to his threat. Only Joe could find a way to get paid for answering his detractors. End Notes

The rumors around town are hot again that U.S. News & World Report magazine Editor Shelby Coffey III is leaving. It looks as though the former deputy managing editor of The Washington Post will be going to Dallas to take over the top job at the Dallas Times Herald. . .

Actress Jessica Lange gave birth to her second daughter this past weekend in Santa Fe, N.M. Lange lives with playwright and actor Sam Shepard, the child's father. The father of her first child, 4-year-old daughter Alexandra, is dancer Mikhail Baryshnikov . . .

South African Bishop Desmond Tutu, a leader in fighting his country's racial separation policies, will receive the 1986 Martin Luther King Jr. Non-Violent Peace Prize during a ceremony next Monday in Atlanta, on the first national holiday commemorating King's birth. Tutu, who received the Nobel Peace Prize in 1984, will deliver the keynote address Sunday at the King Center's International Conference on Apartheid . . .

The late Yul Brynner spent a substantial part of his career playing "The King and I." Anthony Quinn has found the same job security in "Zorba the Greek." He starred in the 1965 film, and after two years playing the musical in 30 cities across the country, he has signed to extend his national tour for another six months. It is the next production scheduled for the National Theatre and will go on to Pittsburgh, Chicago, Milwaukee, Minneapolis, Vancouver, Los Angeles, San Francisco, San Diego, Detroit and Sacramento, Calif. That's a lot of teaching the "boss" how to dance . . .

That was Stacy Keach you saw at the Bristol Hotel, where he is staying with someone described as a "Polish princess" and a small dog named Poopkie. Mike Hammer would never be seen with a small dog named Poopkie. Keach is in town for the upcoming Peter Sellars American National Theater production of Robert Sherwood's Pulitzer Prize-winning "Idiot's Delight," scheduled to open Feb. 27 at the Eisenhower Theater. Also at the Bristol are JoBeth Williams, a favorite actress of Steven Spielberg; Werner Klemperer, Col. Klink of "Hogan's Heroes," and Sam Robards, son of Jason Robards and actress Lauren Bacall. They are all cast in the production at the Kennedy Center, which will boast miles and miles of plexiglass for sets designed in the usual quirky Sellars production style . . .

This is National Pizza Week, and no less a personage than John R. Block, the outgoing secretary of agriculture, proclaimed it so at a luncheon at the National Press Club yesterday. Apparently pizza is now rivaling the American hamburger in popularity. In 1984, Americans consumed an average of seven pizzas per person. With so small an average, obviously there are some people out there not getting their fair share of the pie . . .