Warning against the "unwarranted influence" of the military-industrial complex, former president Eisenhower left the White House 25 years ago with a farewell address that seems especially appropriate now with Gramm-Rudman-Hollings. In memory of that speech, about 50 members of Congress and two Eisenhower grandchildren will gather at a black-tie reception and dinner tribute tonight in the Hyatt Regency Hotel on Capitol Hill. Eisenhower's granddaughter Susan Eisenhower will present awards to those who have worked for an "affordable defense": Sen. Charles Grassley; Rep. Mel Levine; J. Peter Grace, who headed the Grace Commission, and James Fallows, editor of The Atlantic.

At a time when the deficit slashing threatens even the Defense Department's most-privileged status, the celebrity dinner guests will have an opportunity to once again see Eisenhower's famous address as it appeared on the black-and-white television screen Jan. 17, 1961. His grandson David Eisenhower, who is writing a major work on his grandfather, will reminisce about the 34th president.

Among the expected guests are former ambassador Clare Boothe Luce, Supreme Court Justice William Brennan, who was appointed by Eisenhower, former cabinet member Elliot Richardson, former CIA director Stansfield Turner, former secretary of defense Clark Clifford and Ambassador to Italy Maxwell Rabb. CBS correspondent Lesley Stahl will serve as emcee. End Notes

Peter, Paul and Mary obviously don't just belong to the 1960s, when the answers were "blowin' in the wind." Tickets for the Free South Africa Movement concert Feb. 25 in the 2,759-seat Concert Hall of the Kennedy Center were sold out within 24 hours of going on sale Sunday. The only tickets available are the $100-a-person sponsor tickets that entitle concert-goers to a special after-performance party in the Kennedy Center atrium and to have their names printed on the program.

Singer Harry Belafonte will be the show's emcee. Belafonte is so committed to the Free South Africa Movement that he turned down an invitation to be reunited that same evening with the entertainers who made the "We Are the World" record. The planned get-together is to take place at the Grammy Awards in Los Angeles where all the entertainers plan to gather on the stage and sing "We Are the World."

Royal Watch: Princess Margaret will be in town early next week. The British Embassy is reluctant to give any details about the visit, but it is likely she will make a special visit to the "Treasure Houses of Britain" show at the National Gallery. It's a must-see show for the royals . . .

In the wake of the shuttle disaster, the Texas State Society canceled a 150th annniversary of Texas party last night at the Kennedy Center that was to have followed a performance of the Houston Ballet. And the National Symphony Orchestra dedicated last night's performance of "Eroica" to the shuttle astronauts . . .

Former presidential aide Hamilton Jordan, who is expected to announce in March that he will run for the Georgia senate seat now held by Mack Mattingly, said yesterday he was cured completely of lymphoma through an experimental program at the National Cancer Institute. The 42-year-old chief of staff under former president Jimmy Carter showed a written report from the doctors who had treated him with a combination of eight drugs. He told newsmen at a press briefing he held at the cancer institute that he received his last treatment Jan. 6 and is now off all medication . . .

A hospital update on former president Richard Nixon. His doctors report that the 73-year-old Nixon will probably remain in the Miami Heart Institute for another two days. He had contracted a mild case of the flu while vacationing in the Bahamas at the exclusive Cat Cay retreat of his friend, Charles (Bebe) Rebozo, another familiar name from the past . . .

The Chicago Bears may have won the Super Bowl, but due to a complicated mixup, they didn't get to attend a performance by singer Frank Sinatra. Reports had circulated before the big game that the Bears turned down an offer to attend the ageless singer's Jan. 25 concert. The Bears' loss was the Patriots' gain. They bought up the tickets and went to the concert. The Patriots, after all, did deserve something from their trip to New Orleans, other than the Sunday afternoon mauling. Sinatra's people, however, feeling the singer had been slighted by the Bears, looked into the incident and learned that some Bear underling never brought the offer to the Bears to give them the right to accept or refuse. No one knows what has become of the poor malefactor . . .