Channel 9 yesterday won a "silver baton" at the 44th Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards in New sk,2 sw,-2 York . . .

A total of 12 silver batons (a new designation) were awarded this year, as well as a "Gold Baton," which went to ABC News' "Nightline" for its five broadcasts last year from Johannesburg, South Africa . . .

WDVM was honored for its three-part investigative series last year called "Investigation of Dr. Milan Vuitch." The reports by Mark Feldstein led to the closing of a clinic in Laurel, Md., and the revocation of Dr. Vuitch's license . . .

The Vuitch series had previously earned a George Foster Peabody award for Feldstein and the station . . .

The duPont-Columbia award was the first ever for Channel 9, although the station has won five Peabody awards (tying the station with WNBC in New York for the most wins among the nation's commercial TV stations) . . .

In 1981-82, Channel 7 here won a duPont-Columbia award for coverage of the Air Florida plane crash . . .

Among the other silver baton winners for television awarded last night were "CBS Evening News" for a series of reports on Afghanistan; and NBC News for "The Real 'Star Wars' -- Defense in Space," which looked at the political, scientific and military debate behind the Reagan administration defense strategy . . .

Silver batons also went to the Public Broadcasting Service for its series on "The Brain" and to WCAU in Philadelphia, WCCO-TV in Minneapolis and KGUN-TV in Tucson. . .

In the independent television category, Chris-Craft Television Productions and Churchill Films won a silver baton for "Down for the Count -- An Inside Look at Boxing" . . . and in cable television, the Cable News Network and IMAGO Ltd. were honored for "Iran: In the Name of God," a portrait of the Islamic Republic of Iran . . .

Citations were also awarded to WSMV-TV in Nashville and KWWL-TV in Waterloo, Iowa . . .

Silver batons in radio were awarded to DesertWest News, Flagstaff, Ariz., and KNX in Los Angeles . . .

The award ceremonies, broadcast last night on PBS, were held in the Rotunda of Low Memorial Library at Columbia University in New York. CBS' Dan Rather was master of ceremonies . . .

Also in the News

Those philosophers at CBS Entertainment had it right again -- call a mini-series "Sins" and then get out of the way as the money rolls in . . .

The three-parter starring Joan Collins wrapped up its run Tuesday with a 20.6 national Nielsen rating and a 32 percent audience share, considerably ahead of part III of NBC's "Peter the Not So Great," which averaged a 16.6/26 . . .

The 9-to-11 combination of "Moonlighting" and "Spenser: For Hire" on ABC Tuesday averaged a 12.1/19 . . .

Monday night, CBS' "Sins" did a 21.9/32, compared with a 17.6/26 for part II of "Peter" and a 15.9/24 for "The Gladiator" on ABC . . .

Over its three nights, "Sins" averaged a 20.7/31. "Peter the Not So Great," which concluded last night, was averaging a 17.7/27 after three nights . . .

NBC Entertainment yesterday announced it will introduce two new situation comedies in the 8 to 9 p.m. Monday time slot, starting March 3 . . .

"You Again" stars Jack Klugman as "a solitary man whose calm life is shattered when his 17-year-old son decides to move in with him after many years of estrangement following his parents' bitter divorce" . . .

The 8 p.m. entry will be sneak previewed on Thursday, Feb. 27 . . .

"Valerie" stars Valerie Harper as the mother of three teen-age boys maintaining a household during the routine absence of her husband, an international airline pilot . . .

The two shows replace "TV's Bloopers and Practical Jokes," which will return as hilarious specials later in the year . . .

The network also announced that "Misfits of Science" will complete its current run on Feb. 28 but will return as reruns later this year . . .

In addition, "Remington Steele" will move from Tuesday to to Saturday at 10 starting Feb. 22, replacing "Hunter," which moves to Tuesday at 9, starting March 4, and "Riptide," which moves from Tuesday to Friday at 8, replacing "Misfits" as of March 7 . . .

Earlier, NBC announced that "American Almanac" will air at 10 p.m. Tuesdays, starting March 4 . . .

Leaders of Detroit's Arab-American community say they are deeply offended by an upcoming NBC movie, "Under Siege," in which a Middle Eastern terror cell operating out of a suburban Dearborn warehouse blows up domestic airliners, crashes a TNT-laden truck into a military base and launches a rocket attack that demolishes the U.S. Capitol dome . . .

The three-hour movie airs Sunday . . .

Earlier this week, WDIV, the NBC affiliate in Detroit, aired the film for local Arab-American leaders, with NBC officials and writer Christian Williams, the Washington Post reporter who collaborated on the screenplay with Post editors Richard Harwood and Bob Woodward . . .

Don Unis, president of the Arab Community Center for Economic and Social Services in Dearborn's predominantly Arab south end, said he was concerned about possible backlash . . .

"It is unfortunate that they identified Dearborn. We felt that was very unnecessary. It will only inflame anti-Arab feelings that already exist in the city" . . .

The community leaders asked NBC and WDIV officials to consider withdrawing the film or at least deleting the references to Dearborn. Station officials told them no on both counts . . .

Williams said Dearborn was chosen as the terrorists' hideout because "it's the biggest Arab community in the U.S., isn't it? We didn't intend to single them Dearborn out. It didn't really seem important. The script called for him to hide in a community because that's what terrorists do" . . .

In Washington, Jim Zogby, executive director of the Arab-American Institute, said yesterday that about 20,000 Arabs live in Dearborn, some 18 to 20 percent of the total population . . .

"The program ostensibly worries about the loss of civil rights under a terrorist situation in this country but instead is threatening the rights of the Arab people in Dearborn" . . .

Zogby said he had talked to Channel 4 -- the NBC-owned station here -- about either presenting a "wraparound" disucssion program before and after the movie Sunday or offering repeated disclaimers that the film is a work of fiction and that no specific community or ethnic group is being singled out . . .

Zogby said he had received no response to his suggestions . . .

Yesterday, station manager David Nuell said he had heard of no such contacts but was looking into them . . .

Several months ago, NBC aired "Hostage Flight," in which terrorists on a plane were obviously of several nationalities, pinpointing no specific group . . .

"I thought we'd progressed when I saw that," Zogby said yesterday, "but I guess I was wrong" . . .

He said he had also contacted several officials of NBC in New York this week, to no avail. Late yesterday, a spokesman for WRC said the network was considering a "hot line" Sunday night to handle complaints . . .

NBC vice president Curt Block said yesterday that "our view is that the film makes the point several times that you can't blame a whole nationality because of actions of a few people" . . .

Alice Sondra Jackson, 24, who appeared on "CBS Reports: The Vanishing Family -- Crisis in Black America" on Jan. 25, died Sunday after suffering a series of seizures . . .

Yesterday, correspondent Bill Moyers, who anchored and prepared the documentary, and other members of the CBS crew attended funeral services for Ms. Jackson at the Green Pasture Baptist Church, in East Orange, N.J. The Rev. Jesse Jackson delivered the eulogy . . .

Viewers will recall that Ms. Jackson was the second woman interviewed on the program and was shown at the birth of her third child. The documentary was filmed last summer . . .