Those young conservatives are new at civil disobedience and have much to learn. Lesson number one: If you are being interviewed by a television crew, make certain you see the press card.

Members of the Young Conservative Alliance showed up yesterday at Gray & Co.'s Powerhouse offices to protest that the Georgetown public relations firm has signed a contract to represent the Angolan government. Jeff Pandin, Alliance project director, said the group also was demonstrating against the contract the firm has had with the Haitian government for more than a year, and "one being negotiated with the Soviet Union." Standing across the street from the Powerhouse offices, the five demonstrators chanted "Robert Gray, you can't hide, we charge you with genocide." Pandin said the group tried to burn a Soviet flag, but it was too cold to get the fire going. A television crew whose members Pandin said identified themselves as being from a news service interviewed the protesters, and then the protesters left. Unfortunately, that probably was not a news crew.

Asked about the protest, Gray vice president Frank Mankiewicz said, "We had our first yuppie demonstrators," adding that they came in a late-model car and wore three-piece suits and ties. "One of them had to hurry and get home because the cuisinart repairman was coming," he joked.

Mankiewicz, who denied that the firm is negotiating a contract with the Soviet Union, said a Gray & Co. media crew conducted an interview with the protesters, but that he didn't know if they identified themselves as a news operation.

Pandin said the camera crew members he talked to identified themselves as being from "Scripps-Howard." "If they weren't," he added, "then they lied." There is no Scripps-Howard television bureau in Washington. New Face at U.S. News

Former Newsweek magazine editor William Broyles, whose name had been making the rounds as a possible new editor of U.S. News & World Report, has been named a contributing editor of the newsweekly. Broyles, who will continue to live in Houston, will contribute a semimonthly column, the first one beginning in the Feb. 24 issue.

Also in that issue, U.S. News will begin carrying letters Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov has written to his family. The letters, which were smuggled out of the Soviet Union, tell of his psychological and physical mistreatment at the hands of the KGB. U.S. News, which owns North American rights to the letters, will be publishing them simultaneously with the London Observer. End Notes

Rock star Sting's "The Dreams of the Blue Turtles" album is so filled with meaningful songs about peace, detente and the nuclear arms race that the organizers of the peace march on Washington asked him to participate. They wanted to know if he would perform at the massive sendoff concert on March 1 at the L.A. Coliseum. Sting said sure, for $400,000. Now there's a real commitment to peace, or a Sting that stings . . .

Christa McAuliffe, the New Hampshire schoolteacher killed on the space shuttle explosion, has been nominated for a place in the National Women's Hall of Fame. No nominations for Judith Resnik, the astronaut also killed on the Challenger, have yet been received . . .

An arrest warrant has been issued for singer Connie Francis, who failed to show up for arraignment in a case stemming from a December incident in which she was charged with simple battery and criminal trespass when she refused to leave an airplane after refusing to snub out a cigarette at a refueling stop . . .

Yelena Bonner, wife of Soviet dissident Andrei Sakharov, who is recovering from recent heart surgery, took time out to attend the Broadway musical "Cats" Wednesday and went backstage after to meet some of the cats . . .

Not that he needs the money, but wealthy socialite Claus von Bu low, who was acquitted on charges he attempted to murder his wife, will be reviewing two books about the wealthy Getty family for New York Magazine and The Washington Times. It is estimated he will receive $1,000 per publication . . .

Bill Cosby's press agent says it's still possible the comedian might give Stanford's University's commencement speech, but he would like an honorary degree. Stanford President Donald Kennedy says the university does not give honorary degrees. "Every degree should be earned," he says. Now that's a novel concept.