Those young conservatives are learning what civil obedience is all about. Last week members of the Young Conservative Alliance showed up at the highly visible Gray & Co. Powerhouse Offices to protest the Georgetown public relations firm representing the Marxist Angola government. Outmaneuvered last Thursday, four of the young conservatives were back again yesterday, handcuffed themselves to a staircase in the lobby of Gray's offices and were arrested by police.

The four neatly dressed conservatives -- Kile McCreary, 21; Jeffrey Pandin, 24; Warren Simms, 19; and John Scanlon, 21 -- were charged with unlawful entry and taken off to spend the day in jail. A day in jail could turn them into real radicals. Gray Vice President Frank Mankiewicz said the four protesters were invited to meet with Robert Gray or Adm. Daniel J. Murphy, who is in charge of Gray's international division. "They didn't want to talk," he said. "They wanted a media event."

Lee Bellinger, president of the alliance, who describes his group as "contras in the conservative movement," said Gray has seen not the last of them. "They represent the communist regime of Angola and are basically promoting that regime's message. We will continue our guerrilla warfare against the firm. We want to muddy the water for them, make things hard for them." This is worth watching. Who knows? The Hospital Report Former senator James Eastland is in critical condition in Greenwood LeFlore County Hospital near his 5,800-acre Mississippi Delta farm. Once third in line to succeed the president, the 81-year-old former president pro tempore of the Senate opposed all civil rights legislation during his 36 years in Congress. In fact, when Eastland retired in 1978, one Mississippi civil rights leader termed it "the greatest damn thing that has ever happened to this country."

Illinois Rep. John Grotberg remains in a coma at the National Institutes of Health, where he has been in critical condition since Jan. 27. Grotberg was taking part in experimental cancer treatment when an artery became infected. He suffered bleeding, stopped breathing and had a heart attack. End Notes

Does this mean everything is forgiven between Secretary of the Interior Don Hodel and the man he fired last week, Chrysler Chairman Lee Iacocca? Last Saturday Hodel opened a letter addressed to him at his Arlington home with Iacocca's name on the envelope. The letter inside began "Dear Special Customer." The advertising letter signed by Iacocca offered Hodel a $500 rebate if he would purchase a Chrysler. Hodel enjoyed the form letter so much that at a Sunday speech before a group of Republican women in Wyoming, he quipped: "Lee is so reconciled to what I've done he's offered me a $500 rebate on a Chrysler" . . .

Superstars Elizabeth Taylor and Beverly Sills and Washington developer Alan Kay will cohost Wolf Trap's annual Spring Gala to kick off the season. The dinner will be at the Filene Center May 28 and precede a concert by an as-yet-unnamed celebrity . . .

Some Washingtonians who have recently received mail from the Akron, Ohio, vicinity have noticed the stamp cancellation reads: "Judy Resnik, Astronaut in Space, Spartan-Halley Flight." Initially intended as a one-day event to commemorate the ascension of the shuttle, the special cancellation was continued by demand to honor the Akron native, who died in the Challenger disaster. Letters have come in from all across the country and Europe requesting the cancellation, which will be continued through Feb. 22. The Akron postmaster's office has also requested permission to use the Resnik cancellation every year on the anniversary of the disaster . . .

Lyricist Alan Jay Lerner, best known for "My Fair Lady" and other hit Broadway musicals, was sued yesterday in federal court in Manhattan for more than $1.4 million in back taxes and penalties. Lerner, who with longtime collaborator Frederick Loewe was one of the 1985 Kennedy Center Honors award winners, was accused of failing to pay taxes owed on his income from 1977 to 1981 . . .

Singer Willie Nelson plans to combine his annual Fourth of July picnic this year with a second Farm Aid concert in Austin, Texas. After his Farm Aid concert last September in Champaign, Ill., Nelson said he wanted to organize Farm Aid II at Yankee Stadium but couldn't get a date during the baseball season. He also thought of the Washington Monument grounds, but then remembered it is sesquicentennial year in Texas, so he decided he will try to have it at home . . .