Hey! "One Terrific Guy" may have turned out to be one terrific rat in the CBS movie Tuesday, but he turned out to be one terrific ratings getter for the network, easily winning the 9-to-11 time slot against ABC and NBC . . . "Terrific" averaged a 19.6 Nielsen rating and a 30 percent audience share, while "Moonlighting" and "Spenser: For Hire" on ABC averaged a 16.4/25 and the combination of the Academy of Country Music's 20th anniversary reunion and "Remington Steele" on NBC averaged a 14.9/23 . . .

ABC won the night, however . . .

After a day's delay, Gannett broadcasting division executives finally held their get-acquainted meetings with personnel at Channel 9 yesterday . . . marking the official takeover from the Evening News Association (ENA), which Gannett purchased for $717 million last fall . . .

Cecil Walker, acting head of the division, as well as personnel, finance and engineering chiefs from Gannett broadcasting met with the department heads in the morning . . .

And shortly after noon, some 200 nervous Nine employes gathered in Studio 11 for a briefing . . . during which vice president and general manager Ed Pfeiffer handled the Q & A . . .

Assurances were made that the holdover ENA management, led by Pfeiffer, will continue in charge of the station; that a satellite truck, just like the ones at WJLA and WRC, is in the works; that the search for a new site for WDVM is continuing; and that no decision has been made yet as to whether Gannett would change the WDVM call letters to WUSA (the Gannett station in Minneapolis is currently called WUSA but that can be fixed) . . .

"It's not a top priority at this time," said Pfeiffer, "but it might be appropriate for a station in the nation's capital" . . .

In addition, employes were told that no decision has been made as to whether Nine's personnel will be invited to attend the annual Christmas party held at Gannett headquarters across the river in Rosslyn . . .

Our sources said that no refreshments were served at the businesslike but "friendly" meeting . . .

Pfeiffer said later that "basically the mood and feeling of optimism about the future was at a very high level during the meeting" . . .

Local viewers will soon see a public service announcement released yesterday by the American Cancer Society in which actor Yul Brynner makes a posthumous appeal against smoking . . .

It was premiered on ABC yesterday . . .

The 30-second tape is a portion of a January 1985 "Good Morning America" interview with Brynner in which he was asked what he would tell smokers if he could speak to them after his death . . .

In a close-up, Brynner says, "If I could take back that smoking we wouldn't be talking about any cancer. I'm convinced of that" . . .

At another point in the PSA, the former five-packs-a-day smoker says, "Now that I'm gone, I'll tell you: Don't smoke, whatever you do. Just don't smoke" . . .

The GMA tape was donated to the ACS by ABC, as were the services of the McCaffrey-McCall agency in New York, which produced the message, tapes of which are being distributed to the three networks and most of the 700 TV stations around the United States. Plans are also being made to air the PSA in Israel and on Spanish television . . .

In 1968, the ACS also distributed an after-death appeal against smoking by William Tallman, who had played prosecutor Hamilton Burger on "Perry Mason" . . .

Also in the News

Ron Reagan makes his debut on ABC's "Good Morning America" next Wednesday, reporting on the previous evening's Grammy awards . . .

He will do one report each hour . . .

The president's son also has completed a piece for GMA on a ranch in California (no, not that one, sillies) where young women are trained as rodeo riders . . . It's still being edited and has not been scheduled . . .

Ron hosted the Feb. 8 telecast of "Saturday Night Live," appearing in his skivvies . . .

Don't run right out to the water cooler, but we hear that "Hotel" executive producer Douglas Cramer has fired producer Geoffrey Fischer from the show because Fischer and star James Brolin weren't getting along . . .

(Now that's one terrific TV item, Airwaves) . . .

Maryland Public Television, despite its turndown for funding from PBS stations in the recently completed program auction, plans six more Wolf Trap specials next season . . . and already has $700,000 in underwriting toward the project from the Martin Marietta Corp. . . .

Channel 50, scheduled to go on the air next month here, has purchased "On the Record," a weekly half-hour record review show hosted by music critics Bob Christgau of the Village Voice and Steve Pond . . .

The program, which will air starting next fall, is syndicated by the Samuel Goldwyn Co. . . .

And Finally

From the I Think Henry Just Misses the Coneheads file:

Writer/broadcaster Henry Morgan has written to NBC Entertainment president Brandon Tartikoff, complaining about the Feb. 8 "Saturday Night Live" (yes, the one in which Ron Reagan opened the show in his skivvies . . .

He called the program "so unrelievedly shocking that it embarrassed me to think that it could be aired in my country . . . No adult nor even bright child can be found to say NO to the apparently retarded 'writers' . . .

"Since the reeking ordure of the creative department is matched by the ineptitude of the cast, one can conclude that the network itself is in the hands of morons. Whoever is ultimately responsible for this tragic accumulation of filth is himself revolting" . . .