This week and next will be Connie Chung's last as anchor for the "NBC News at Sunrise" in the foreseeable future . . .

The chances of her returning to the early-early-morning show are slim . . . although nobody at NBC News will come right out and say she's gone for good . . .

Bob Jamieson, who has been filling in for Chung for the most part since she began her chores on "American Almanac" months ago, takes over on a regular basis next week . . .

In the past five months, Chung has appeared on "Sunrise" only 28 times, according to one count, and indications are, as she negotiates for a new contract with the network, the early, early morning chores do not figure in her future . . .

Currently, in addition to her chores as "chief correspondent" for "Almanac" and sometime "Sunrise" anchor, she also anchors the Saturday edition of "NBC Nightly News" and handles the Wednesday and Thursday night news digests when "Almanac" assignments permit . . .

A one-hour documentary on the consequences of drunk driving produced by Channel 4 reporter Kelly Burke will be aired Wednesday, May 7, on the Public Broadcasting Service, including WETA here . . .

In July 1984, Burke, driving alone in his 1983 GMC van, was involved in a head-on collision between his vehicle and a small truck driven by Dennis Lee Crouch, 32 , of Poolesville, Md.

Crouch died a few hours later in Suburban Hospital, leaving his wife Sandra Leigh Crouch, who was eight months pregnant with the couple's first child at the time of the crash, and an 8-year-old son by a previous marriage . . .

Burke suffered a broken ankle in the early-morning accident . . .

In November of that year, Burke pleaded guilty to charges of driving under the influence of alcohol and failure to stay in the proper lane. At the time, in exchange for the guilty pleas, prosecutors agreed to drop a more serious charge against Burke of homicide with a motor vehicle while intoxicated . . .

In January 1985, Burke was fined $500 and placed on unsupervised probation for two years, on the condition he produce a documentary on the consequences of drunk driving . . .

In June 1985 an insurance company representing Burke agreed to pay more than $2 million to Mrs. Crouch and the two surviving children . . .

Major funding for the program was supplied by Mid-Atlantic Toyota Distributors Inc. . . .

Channel 4, which just last week returned Burke to the air, had declined to show the documentary after it was completed last year . . .

Friday, WRC Vice President and General Manager Fred DeMarco said that "when we looked at it, we didn't think it was appropriate to air as a documentary on our station. It was subjective journalism, too personal" . . .

"Drinking and Driving: The Toll, the Tears" includes not only Burke's response to the Crouch family tragedy and its impact on his own, but the stories of 11 other drunk-driving-induced family tragedies . . . Home movies and family photographs are used extensively in the program . . .

Also in the News

"Hi. I'm Don Johnson" . . .

"Could I see your driver's license and registration, please?" responded Miami police officer Randall Kugler, who had just stopped the "Miami Vice" star's Mercedes-Benz sedan at the Key Biscayne ramp to Interstate 95 at 1:15 a.m. last Tuesday for going, Kugler said later, "very fast, very, very fast" . . .

Kugler cited the actor for driving 82 mph in a 55-mph zone . . .

On the set later that morning, Johnson (a k a Sonny Crockett) told Metro-Dade Police Cmdr. Nelson Oramos, technical adviser on the show, about the ticket . . .

Oramos arranged to have the ticket "reviewed." Police Cmdr. William Johnson said Friday, "We canceled it for him. We asked the officer to reconsider and the ticket was canceled" . . .

Explained Johnson, the other Johnson "has done a tremendous amount of community service . . . It wasn't a situation where anyone's life was endangered." Denying the ticket was fixed, Johnson said, "The ticket was canceled. We cancel tickets. We have a cancellation form. Fixing tickets is a whole different thing" . . .

Three hours after a reporter from The Miami Herald called the actor's press agent in California about the incident, policeman Johnson changed the story . . .

"I was given some bad information," he said. After talking to the press agent, he had discovered that the ticket had not been canceled after all . . .

The press agent, Lili Ungar, said Don Johnson didn't want to "cause the police department any problems because that was the last thing he had in mind. Don will pay the ticket" . . .

Kugler said it will cost Don $102.50 . . .

On another front, executives of Univeral Studios say they may pull "Miami Vice" out of Miami and film it in Southern California instead if NBC doesn't pony up more money for the costly weekly episodes . . .

NBC pays Universal Studios $950,000 an episode for "Miami Vice," but the show is budgeted at about $1.4 million per and some episodes have cost as much as $2 million, according to show sources . . .

NBC Entertainment President Brandon Tartikoff, in response to reports of the threat, said, "What's left unsaid here is that Universal has to get a little better at their business. And I don't know if that's their problem anyway -- the expense of doing it in Miami. It's an expensive show no matter where you did it" . . .

Series sources said the Universal deficit has more than doubled since "Miami Vice's" first season in 1984 . . .

Talks between Universal and NBC are reportedly under way . . . but the problem exists for numerous long-form shows on all three networks and is reportedly holding up production of some dramatic series pilots this spring . . .

Hour-long shows have become so expensive that network fees, if a show goes to series, don't come close to actual production costs each week . . .

A few years ago, studios took the chance of absorbing the difference, in the hope that all the costs would be made up when the series eventually went to syndicated rerun status . . .

However, the syndication of hour series has fallen off recently in favor of half-hour sitcoms and studios are more and more reluctant to take the plunge on the longer form . . .

Carol Ross Joynt, producer of Charlie Rose's one-hour "Nightwatch" interview with Charles Manson Thursday morning, reports that Warren Beatty's New York office called asking for a cassette . . .

And yes, it made her day . . .

Speaking of Rose, he'll be sitting in for Forrest Sawyer on "CBS Morning News" again later this month . . . and CBS News executives have plans to use Rose as a correspondent on some documentaries later this year . . .

The division wants to try out a format this summer in which CBS News would visit the location of a major domestic issue to talk to the people involved, emphasizing the community concerned, as well as the issue . . .

CBS News Senior Vice President David Fuchs cites the current Hormel packing plant strike in Austin, Minn., as an example. "It would have been appropriate for us to have been there with this format long before it became a nightly news story, for instance" . . .

According to Fuchs, the so-called "Americana" series is the idea of Jon Katz, former "CBS Morning News" executive producer, who is now director of planning . . .

Bill Moyers, who was originally penciled in to do a series of such documentaries, appears more and more likely to be leaving CBS News when his contract is up in November . . .

Hence the interest in Rose as Moyers' replacement . . .

Another Leaf

Actually, two leaves, from the local February ratings sweeps books . . .

In the primetime race, Mondays through Sundays, Arbitron put Channel 9 (CBS) first with a 15.4 rating average and a 26 percent audience share. Nielsen also put Nine first but with an 18.4/28 (a rating point is worth about 15,000 TV homes in both books) . . .

Four (NBC) was a close second in ARB at 15.3/26, but trailed by 1.3 rating points in Nielsen at 17.1/26 . . .

With Nielsen numbers in parentheses, Seven (ABC) was third in ARB at 12.7/21 (13.9/21), followed by independent Five with 7.6/13 (7.5/12) and independent Twenty with 3.1/5 (3.0/5) . . .

Sign-on to sign-off (7 a.m. to 1 a.m.), Mondays through Sundays, Nine led with a 7.8/22 in ARB and a 9.8/24 in Nielsen . . .

Again reflecting the difference in the two books, Seven was second with a 6.8/19 in ARB but was third, with a 7.5/18, in Nielsen . . . while Five was third in ARB at 6.7/19 but fourth in Nielsen at 7.0/17 . . .

Four was fourth in ARB at 6.4/18 but second in Nielsen at 7.9/19. Twenty was fifth in both books at 2.3/7 (2.6/7), while Twenty-Six (PBS) registered a 0.9/3 in ARB . . .