Channel 7, still trying to shake its bridesmaid status in the local news race, tonight unveils a new set, a new "jazzy" musical theme and new graphics . . .

According to news director Tom Doerr, the new set uses "nonprimary colors" -- silver and maroon -- and "is not a traditional news set at all. There's no 'Starship Enterprise' setting . . .

"We've eliminated as many distractions as we could because the focus is on the anchors" . . .

For the early news, Doerr said, the background "is sort of maroon or reddish, and at night it has a real blue feel to it" . . .

The sets were designed at the station by art director Mike Helsley and executive producer Mike Crew while the original music was recorded in Atlanta . . .

Getting no argument from Captain Airwaves, Doerr said the discarded "music and set were just tired and old-fashioned. We wanted to catch up. The object was to design a set around the anchors" . . .

At NBC News, they're saying the primetime outing for "Main Street" has been set for Monday, June 9. "Main Street," hosted by Bryant Gumbel, is the monthly afternoon program for young teen-agers that's been getting considerable critical acclaim . . .

And, as long as you have your Official Airwaves Calendars in front of you this morning, TV Column fans, you might pencil in July 4, when the "Today" show will air from 7 a.m. until 11 a.m. while covering the Statue of Liberty dedication ceremonies of the day . . .

On both July 3 and July 4, NBC will also air primetime specials geared to the celebration . . . (ABC, which paid $10 million for the key rights to the celebrations, will have a considerably more elaborate schedule) . . .

Strategic alms talks on two local public TV stations ended Sunday with negotiators at both Channel 26 and Channel 32 reporting success . . .

WETA saved its best day for last as all Sunday programming, including the "Gala of Stars 1986" from Vienna, netted $81,154 to put the station over the top in its 17-day drive to raise $650,000 . . .

Final total: $693,151 on 13,589 pledges . . .

ngle most cce$(FOOTNOTE)ul program during the run and the most popular premium were both named "Anne of Green Gables." More than 1,000 copies of L.M. Montgomery's lovable book were sold at $40 per . . .

WHMM, the Howard University station, completed its 16-day drive short of its $225,000 goal but with a record total of $121,000, by far its best fund-raising effort ever . . . and the direct-mail pledges are still being counted . . .

Biggest fundraiser: "America's Music" on March 8, which attracted more than $10,000 in pledges . . .

The Maryland Public Television system, meanwhile, had raised $481,728 toward its goal of $600,000 through Sunday night. The current drive ends tonight . . .

Part I of "If Tomorrow Comes" on CBS Sunday kept building its audience through the night -- at least in Nielsen's 12 big-city markets -- to average a 21.7 rating and a 33 percent audience share for its 2 1/2 primetime hours (with President Reagan's speech at 8 p.m., the mini-series ran over until 11:30) . . .

The Donahue show returns to Washington tomorrow morning for a live broadcast at 9 a.m. from Channel 9. The subject will be the upcoming vote on contra aid. Debating the pros and contras will be Assistant Secretary of State Elliott Abrams and Rep. Michael Barnes (D-Md.) . . .

Also in the News

Management of Channel 50 said yesterday that it's definite -- the former pay TV station will inaugurate its new schedule starting at 6 a.m., Monday, March 31 . . . with an energetic "20 Minute Workout" . . .

Mondays through Fridays, the morning schedule on WFTY will include, in order, "Rocky," "Alvin," "Superfriends," "Mighty Mouse I," "The Fun World of Hanna-Barbera," "The Flying Nun," "Gomer Pyle" and the morning movie . . .

Starting at noon, it'll be "Good Housekeeping," a matinee movie, "My Three Sons," "Alvin," "Mighty Mouse II," "Scooby" and "Little House on the Prairie" . . .

Starting at 6 p.m., it's "Beverly Hillbillies," "Mary Tyler Moore," "Bob Newhart," "Hogan's Heroes," "Cannon," more "Mary Tyler Moore," the 9 o'clock movie and "The Honeymooners" . . .

Mondays through Thursday at 11:30 p.m., it will be "Perry Mason" (which is replaced by the Friday movie on Friday), followed by "Comedy Tonight" at 12:30 (CNN News at 1:30 a.m. on Fridays) . . .

We'll try to give you the weekend schedules tomorrow . . .

ABC sources yesterday backed off a report that a head-to-toe revamping of "Good Morning America" is currently in the works or that there are plans to transfer control of the morning show from the Entertainment division to ABC News . . .

Amy Kopelan, director of early-morning programming at ABC Entertainment, said yesterday that "sure, someday we're going to review the elements of the program, but that's down the line" . . .

She said that right now the current staff of "GMA" is "our team and we love them. We still get a good audience response from the program" . . .

Although the contracts of both host David Hartman and his sidekick Joan Lunden are up at the end of the year, "nobody's talking about replacing them," said Kopelan . . .

Kopelan pointed out that ratings for the program -- which over the last three months has lost the morning lead to NBC's "Today" -- have remained consistent over a long period, despite the primetime failures of ABC, usually a factor in declining morning ratings . . .

While the renascent "Today" can now command up to $17,000 for a 30-second commercial, Kopelan said "GMA" "is still in the $15,000-$16,000 range it has been for a long time" . . .

Meanwhile, reports that the new management at Capital Cities/ABC Inc. wants to move control of the program to ABC News were denied at several levels yesterday (that story pops up at least as often as the swallows return to Capistrano). . .

With several primetime news projects being considered for the fall, including an hour magazine show to fit in the 8-to-9 p.m. Thursday time slot against NBC's powerhouse "The Cosby Show" and a possible business report (depending on affiliate response), the News division is stretched already . . .

"We're not going after it," one ABC News source said yesterday, referring to the "GMA" report, "and as far as I know nobody from top management has even discussed the idea with Roone (Arledge, ABC News president)" . . .

Last week John B. Sias, president of ABC, dropped by Arledge's West Side office to discuss long-range plans but our sources yesterday said the subject of "GMA" did not come up during the meeting . . .

Despite yesterday's denials -- there is a new management at Cap Cities/ABC that could well have a still-unrevealed agenda for "GMA" and News, which neither organization knows anything about. And GMA is no longer the uncatchable morning leader. In TV, even a new management gets touchy about things like that . . .

As it becomes more and more apparent that Bill Moyers will probably not stick around at CBS News when his current contract runs out later this year . . . the scenarios are being floated by know-nothings regarding his future almost daily. . .

They include a New York political career for Lyndon Johnson's former close aide but the one we kinda favor this morning is -- the literate Bill Moyers regularly debating the Issue du Jour with the literate George Will on "ABC World News Tonight With the Literate Peter Jennings" . . .(END FOOT)