Sydney Pollack said his award "doesn't make me think that I'm the best director, because that's just not true." Geraldine Page said she was wonderful in "The Trip to Bountiful" but that she figured her seven previous losses and academy politics were as responsible for her win as her performance was. A "Witness" writer said he was "100 percent sure" he'd win, then sharply criticized director Peter Weir for having no respect for his screenwriters and trying to change everything about the script. And the 1985 Oscars, thank goodness, are history . . .

Which means Hollywood can get back to the business of making movies that are designed to make money. Movies like, say, "Police Academy 3," which doesn't have a prayer of winning anything a year from now, but which nonetheless enjoyed the biggest opening weekend totals of 1986. After debuting last Friday, the film made $9 million in its first three days, the heftiest total so far this year.

Ron Howard's "Gung Ho" held that record for one week, but slipped to second place over the weekend; the head-to-head comparison is misleading, though, because "Police Academy 3" opened in half as many theaters as "Gung Ho," which had a much better per-screen average in its first week. Trailing those two were two shades of red, "Pretty in Pink" and "The Color Purple." A pair of cartoons split the kiddie business evenly: The 27-year-old "Sleeping Beauty" and the new "Care Bears Movie II" each pulled in $2.5 million. Back to the Sequel

Things are looking increasingly positive for a sequel to last year's box office champ, "Back to the Future," though nobody involved in the first film was contractually obligated to do a second.

The biggest problem facing Robert Zemeckis, the first film's director and cowriter, seems to be figuring out what that sequel should be. Zemeckis has reportedly told friends that he's stymied writing the sequel because there's no end to the number of directions in which he could take it. Still, look for another Marty McFly adventure when he does decide on a direction.

Film Clips

An unknown actor has reportedly been cast as John Belushi in the film version of Bob Woodward's Belushi bio "Wired." Belushi pal Dan Aykroyd, meanwhile, will not play himself.

While that film prepares to show one side of some former "Saturday Night Live" performers, current "SNL" writer/performer Terry Sweeney and writer Lanier Laney are making their own stab at the big screen via a screenplay.

They have written a script for director John Moffett and for producer Michael Gruskoff ("Young Frankenstein," "My Favorite Year"); it's a comedy about the Salem witch trials with a title Elvis would have appreciated: "Burnin' Love" . . .

"Star Trek IV" started filming a few weeks ago, and this time the crew of the Starship Enterprise won't spend all its time in futuristic, alien environments. Part of the film is reportedly set in the present day, which they visit via that honored sci-fi convention, the time warp. The filmmakers have even written a reference to the Challenger disaster into the script . . .

There's no reference to Challenger in the script to 20th Century-Fox's upcoming "Spacecamp," but the movie probably will stir up some uneasy memories nonetheless. The film, due out this summer and starring Kate Capshaw, Lea Thompson and Tom Skerritt, is about a group of kids at an astronaut training camp who accidentally find themselves shot into space; the last half of the movie takes place aboard the shuttle . . .

His old "Happy Days" pal Ron Howard already has made a profitable career out of directing; now Henry Winkler is trying his hand behind the camera. Winkler has reportedly signed to direct an action comedy, "Happy Hour," for Tri-Star. Richard Dreyfuss stars.