If you've noticed a number of people walking dogs in the vicinity of the Westin Hotel and around the Kennedy Center, it's because American Ballet Theatre is in town and it travels with 12 dogs and eight cats. The Westin does have a no-pets policy and the animals aren't exactly welcomed at the Kennedy Center, but it is possible in some cases to look the other way. And they are not all lap dogs. Dancer Danilo Radojevic has a golden retriever and Gil Boggs has a black Labrador. Patrick Bissell and fiance' Amy Rose, on the other hand, have a pair of cats named Bonnie and Clyde. ABT Artistic Director Mikhail Baryshnikov is also a pet lover, but his big German shepherd isn't traveling with him.

The pets can be a problem. Last December when ABT was here, Ross Stretton sprained his ankle while out walking his dog one evening and was unable to perform.

Tonight, on its night off, the company will be at the Kennedy Center-ABT fundraiser, the Giselle Ball, also at the Westin, which is cohosted by actress Lynda Carter and ABT board member Adrienne Feldman. The guest list includes Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, Sen. Larry Pressler, Kennedy Center Artistic Director Marta Istomin and Sargent and Eunice Shriver. End Notes

Author Arianna Stassinopoulos, who wrote "Maria Callas: The Woman Behind the Legend," was married Saturday to petroleum executive R. Michael Huffington in St. Bartholomew's Church in New York City. Huffington is an executive in a Houston energy company founded by his father. Included as attendants in the wedding party was Chief of Protocol Selwa Roosevelt and television's Barbara Walters . . .

Anthony Lukas, author of "Common Ground," and Robert Norrell, author of "Reaping the Whirlwind," are the winners of the sixth annual Robert F. Kennedy Bookendcol Award. The award was established in 1980 by Arthur Schlesinger Jr. out of proceeds from the sale of his biography "Robert Kennedy and His Times." The $2,500 prize will be shared by Lukas and Norrell . . .

It may have rained for a bit yesterday afternoon, but it didn't hinder the Fourth Annual Smash-In Congressional/Celebrity Tennis Tournament at the Rock Creek Tennis Stadium. The tournament, which raises money for the Washington Area Tennis Patrons Association to fund programs for youth and the handicapped, this year brought in an estimated $35,000 to $40,000. Yesterday's tournament was the culmination of a month of fund-raising events including a dinner given by Vice President George and Barbara Bush. Among those competing yesterday were Reps. Howard Coble and Norman Dicks, ABC correspondent John Scali, CBS "Nightwatch" host Charlie Rose, WJLA personalities Jim Berry and Wes Sarginson, and ABC newsman Brit Hume . . .

Former NASA director Christopher Kraft presented 37 years of his professional papers -- some 30 cubic feet of technical reports, notes, correspondence and other papers -- to his alma mater, Virginia Tech, this weekend in Blacksburg. The 1945 graduate said in response to a question about manned and unmanned space flight: "Manned space flights are necessary, just as in the exploration of the West, the exploration of the seas and any exploration in the future. The argument of manned versus unmanned space activities is frivolous . . . We want to explore the unknown and it can't just be done by computers alone" . . .

All those reports about former White House deputy chief of staff Michael Deaver using his personal relationship with the Reagans to build his firm's client list and about the fees he charges apparently haven't caused him much damage. The current issue of U.S. News & World Report says White House aides are talking about using Deaver to help arrange Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev's summit visit to the United States, especially to help plan a tour of the nation's major tourist attractions . . .