The delayed broadcast of Part II of "Dream West" on CBS Tuesday night got an 18.1 national Nielsen rating (representing 15.5 million TV homes) and a 29 percent audience share . . . good enough, anyway, to knock ABC's ld,10 "Moonlighting" into second place at 9 p.m. . . .

But not good enough to take Tuesday night from ABC . . .

Part I of the ill-starred mini-series attracted an audience of 16.7 million homes on Sunday night with a 19.5 rating and a 29 share, finishing 15th in the weekly ratings . . .

The three-hour conclusion, which was pulled from the network because of various scheduling problems in the wake of the Libyan crisis, will be seen on Sunday night, the last night of the regular season . . .

Moving Right Along

Here's a couple of names you might not notice in the story (see Page C14) on the 100 semifinalists in NASA's journalist-in-space project . . .

With three more selection panels to go, Jim Hartz, who used to anchor at Channel 4 here, once cohosted a PBS show for oldsters with Mary Martin and is now host of the "Innovations" program for WNET in New York, made the list . . .

As did former CBSer Morton Dean, now with INN . . .

Warren P. Corbett, of Biznet here, also qualified . . . along with CNN's Thomas Mintier Jr. . . .

Contrary to a report from NBC last night, which we regret printing, CBS' Walter Cronkite also made the list . . .

Uncle Walter promptly issued a statement yesterday, saying, "I am pleased I have made it through the first round and look forward even more to the fact that I will have the opportunity to compete further for this privileged assignment" . . .

And, to review the network candidates (the presence of whom guarantees that at least one bar napkin from the Cafe Des Artistes will reach space, eventually):

From NBC: Theresa M. Anzur, Jay Barbree and Robert Bazzell . . .

From ABC: Barry Serafin, James Wooten, William Blakemore and Lynn Sherr . . .

CBS had no publicized applicants other than Cronkite. At the time applications went in, several CBS correspondents, including Dan Rather, expressed interest in the program, but with a nudge from management, a consensus was reached that Cronkite, who has followed the U.S. space program from its inception, should get the nod . . .

Speaking of space, NBC announced yesterday that on April 26 "Saturday Night Live" will repeat the February broadcast that featured Ron Reagan, son of the president, as guest host . . . In the opening sequence, he dances around the Oval Office in his underwear . . .

Also in the News

National Nielsen figures are out for network news coverage Monday night between 9 and 10 p.m. The figures include audience levels for President Reagan's eight-minute address to the nation at the top of the hour . . .

CBS News, which remained on the air for the full hour, was the winner, with a 23.6 Nielsen rating and a 34 percent audience share . . .

NBC News, which was on the air until 9:53 with its Libya coverage, was second with a 19.3/27, while ABC News, which, as usual, performed better among Nielsen's 12 big cities (where its affiliates' news shows tend to dominate), wound up with a 16.2/23 for its coverage between 9 and 9:37 p.m. . . .

Speaking of Monday night . . . CBS News wants everybody to know that CBS News was first early Tuesday morning with Libyan TV coverage of the air attack because Bob Schieffer went on the air at 3 a.m. sharp . . .

Airwaves yesterday had reported that Schieffer went on the air at 3:40 a.m., long after ABC's Ted Koppel at 3:17 a.m., because a CBS spokesperson had told Airwaves (who left his Big Shoulders at home this morning) that Schieffer went on the air at 3:40 a.m. 'Nuff said . . .

That out of the way, CBS News says that it was first on the air yesterday afternoon at 4:29 with a report from Tripoli that Libyan leader Muammar Qaddafi was appearing on TV . . .

ABC followed at 4:35 and NBC got on the air at 4:40 with the report . . . CBS News also reports that CBS News had refrained all day from speculation that Qaddafi had either fled or was dead, while both ABC and NBC, citing U.S. intelligence sources, engaged in just such speculation, according to CBS News . . .

The Los Angeles Times reports that KABC, the ABC-owned station in Los Angeles, has laid off 50 in recent days . . .

That brings the total of people laid off at ABC stations in the past week or so to an estimated 165. Earlier WLS in Chicago and WABC in New York had announced layoffs . . .

Far be it from Captain Airwaves to Reveal A Plot but columnist Marilyn Beck says in the final episode of "Dynasty" next month, Blake will be last seen choking that nice Alexis; Claudia's suite at La Mirage will be in flames, presumably with poor Claudia in them (Pamela Bellwood, who plays poor Claudia, has already said she won't be back next fall); and the wedding of Dominique and Garrett "comes to a screeching halt when she discovers that (gasp) he has lied about his marital past" . . .

In his interview with Barbara Walters on ABC's "20/20" tonight, former budget director David Stockman, whose book is out this week, tells her more about the Reagan "inner circle's" obsession with the tube . . .

At meetings with James Baker, Edwin Meese and Michael Deaver, he tells Walters, "I was always sitting there at these meetings with a hand calculator. The numbers weren't adding up, the deficit was growing but at 6:30 every night, when the evening news went on, the TV remote control switch won" . . .

Carol Burnett is going to do a variety special for ABC . . .

Channel 7 anchor Renee Poussaint is in Israel on a personal visit but she took time out yesterday to tape an interview with Israeli Prime Minister Shimon Peres, which will air soon on WJLA . . .

And Richard Threlkeld, who was recently in Cuba for three days, will have a report on the 25th anniversary of the Bay of Pigs tonight on "ABC World News Tonight" . . .

And Finally

A couple of stories to make us all feel better this morning, TV Column fans . . .

Last week, "The MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour" aired a lengthy segment that showed the inner workings of the admissions process at Williams College . . .

One of the points made was the impact of alumni donations on admissions for alumni children. Also in the broadcast, the Williams staff was seen debating the application of an underprivileged but very promising minority candidate whose grades weren't up to standards . . .

Following that broadcast, a man called to verify that the college's decision -- one way or the other -- on his own child's admission was in the mail. Learning that it was, he promptly donated $25,000 to the education of the minority girl at Williams . . .

The next night, "MacNeil/Lehrer" broadcast a further story about Williams admission, telling of two impoverished brothers, one of whom had already dropped out of the college, faced with the high cost of education . . .

Yesterday, a spokesman for the PBS program said that after seeing that broadcast, a "very well-known celebrity, who will withdraw the offer if his name is ever made public," donated $50,000 toward the education at Williams of both youngsters . . .