The director of the Hirshhorn Museum was incorrectly identified in a story in early editions of yesterday's Style section. He is James T. Demetrion.

Mitch Snyder, Washington's celebrity activist for the homeless, and his long-time companion Carol Fennelly are leaving today for the West Coast premiere of "Samaritan: The Mitch Snyder Story," but Snyder is not going to watch it. Fennelly said she's seen an unfinished version of the film, but that Snyder is both superstitious and uncomfortable about watching actor Martin Sheen play him in the movie. She says he may not watch it at the May 12 Washington benefit showing at the National Theatre or when it is shown over CBS on May 19.

Fennelly said she understands Snyder's problem because she has seen actress Roxanne Hart's portrayal of her and found it difficult to watch. "I wish I hadn't seen it," she said. "We'll have a Beta copy of the movie," she added, "if and when Mitch ever wants to see it."

As for the Hollywood premiere Thursday, Snyder will be in his customary army fatigue jacket and jeans. But Fennelly, who gets most of her clothing from the Community for Creative Non-Violence clothing room, added that while he may dress that way, "I'm not Mitch." She expressed her concern about what to wear to Marvin and Suzanne Goldman, owners of the K-B Theatres. To her surprise, the couple bought her a complete outfit, conservative, but suitable for a California premiere.

End Notes

There is now a new James Bond. He's 6-foot-2-inch blond Australian Finlay Light, who has just signed a 10-year contract to play the role. The former male model comes from the town of Byron Bay on the coast of New South Wales . . .

John Zaccaro Jr., son of former vice presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro, pleaded innocent yesterday to a new charge of selling cocaine to an undercover policewoman. The new charge, coming two months after one of possession with intent to sell, is considered more serious and carries a maximum sentence of five years in jail and a $10,000 fine or both. Zaccaro was arrested Feb. 20 outside a bar the night a police officer allegedly purchased cocaine from him at his apartment. Police said a later search of his car turned up eight grams of cocaine and records detailing his alleged drug-dealing activities. Zaccaro is free on his own recognizance . . .

The National Gallery continues to be a place to see celebrities. The gallery set aside yesterday for press previews of the newest exhibition there, "Impressionist to Early Modern Painting From the U.S.S.R.," which is the first major Soviet-American art exchange resulting from the Geneva summit. It opens Thursday. Unexpectedly, Helen Hayes, Eli Wallach, Anne Jackson, Eva Marie Saint and director Jeffrey Hayden, who were in town for last night's Helen Hayes Awards, showed up to tour the show . . .

Richard McCooey, one of Washington's best-known restaurant and bar owners, last year sold his empire in the shadow of Georgetown University -- the 1789, The Tombs and F. Scott's -- to the ever-growing Clyde's Inc. About 150 of his friends organized a tribute day for McCooey Sunday that started with a mass at Georgetown University's Copley Chapel led by the Rev. James English, former pastor of Holy Trinity Church. McCooey, a 1952 graduate of the university, was class president all four years and president of the student body. After the mass, his friends, including House Speaker Tip O'Neill, former Cabinet secretary Joe Califano, attorney Edward Bennett Williams, former ambassador John Scali and Jane Amsterdam, editor of Manhattan, inc., observed the 25th anniversary of the 1789 with a reception at F. Scott's and dinner in The Tombs . . .

A stolen watercolor by American modernist Joseph Stella was turned over to the Hirshhorn Museum by FBI Director William Webster yesterday following an unsuccessful decade-long search to find its owner. The 23-by-17-inch painting, dated 1917 and depicting the Brooklyn Bridge, was part of a collection obtained by agents from a cooperative witness during a federal grand jury investigation, officials said. The painting and other artworks had been given to the witness to sell by someone in the New York area who was under federal investigation in a stolen-property case. That person, whose identity was not disclosed, died before charges could be brought and there was never any prosecution in the case. The watercolor was described by Hirshhorn officials as an important addition to the museum. It is valued at between $30,000 and $40,000 and will go on public display at the Hirshhorn, which already has 34 works by Stella, a pivotal figure in 20th century American art.