It looks like the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame will be located in Cleveland, with an announcement expected there Monday. A number of cities, such as Memphis, Chicago and Philadelphia, were vying for it, but Cleveland had aggressively campaigned, using city officials, endorsements from top performers and about 660,000 signatures from residents.

Cleveland's big claim was that the term "rock 'n' roll" was coined in 1951 by Cleveland disc jockey Alan Freed and record store owner Leo Mintz. The city also ranks No. 1 in per capita rock record sales and is said to have hosted America's first rock concert, the Moon Dog Coronation Ball, March 21, 1952.

The posturing and secrecy surrounding the selection of Cleveland is so extreme that Jane Scott, the Cleveland Plain Dealer's longtime rock reporter, said yesterday that it wasn't possible to confirm a report in USA Today that Cleveland was the choice.

The Liberty List

A controversy surrounding the Statue of Liberty Celebration in July is centering on complaints that Irish, Italian, French, Norwegian and Swedish nationalities are not represented among those foreign-born Americans who will be receiving medals. The 12 naturalized Americans who will be presented medals by President Reagan July 3 were selected by a panel that included Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, television personality Barbara Walters and authors Alex Haley, Theodore H. White and Arthur Schlesinger Jr.

On their list are comedian Bob Hope, born in England; former secretary of state Henry Kissinger (Germany); composer Irving Berlin (Russia); astronaut Franklin R. Chang-Diaz (Costa Rica); psychologist Kenneth Clark (Jamaica); Hanna Holborn Gray, University of Chicago president (Germany); architect I.M. Pei (China); violinist Itzhak Perlman (Israel); journalist James B. Reston (Scotland); Dr. Albert B. Sabin, inventor of the oral polio vaccine (Russia); An Wang, founder of Wang Labs Inc. (China); and author Elie Wiesel (Romania). Jonas Halperin, a spokesman for the Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island Foundation, said that even in the face of threatened protest demonstrations during Liberty Weekend, no changes or additions would be made to the list. folo10f End Notes The Rev. Jerry Falwell has been having problems raising money for his Liberty Foundation, but he did all right when he signed with Simon and Schuster for his autobiography. When Michael Korda, editor in chief of Simon and Schuster, was asked yesterday if the publishing house had paid $1 million for the book, "Faith: Strength for the Journey," scheduled for spring publication and sold by superagent Irving (Swifty) Lazar, he answered, "I never give numbers, but that's not out of the ballpark" . . .

That was quite a foursome early yesterday morning batting a tennis ball around on the St. Albans tennis courts: singer Pat Boone, Sen. Larry Pressler, Motion Picture Association of America President Jack Valenti and former chief of protocol Lloyd Hand. The Boone-Hand team handily took care of Valenti-Pressler, 8-6, 6-4 . . .

There are doctors and dentists to the stars, and Judy Pneski has been known as dentist to the artists. Tomorrow she will marry one of the city's more respected artists, Robin Rose. There will be a legal ceremony, but later in the day Herb White, owner of the late, lamented Herb's Restaurant, will officiate at a wedding ceremony written by the couple . . .

Socially connected Bettye Bradley, who had been at the Watergate Hotel for seven years and the Embassy Row the past three, has become the head concierge at the Vista . . .

David Stockman has been out on the hustings selling his book "The Triumph of Politics: Why the Reagan Revolution Failed," with obvious success. Published by Harper & Row on April 23, the book he was reportedly paid $2.3 million to write will be No. 4 on this Sunday's Washington Post best-seller list and No. 1 on the May 11 New York Times list.