Washington consultant Nancy Clark Reynolds, who cochaired the U.S. delegation to the United Nations Women's Conference in Nairobi last year, will receive the OEF Women in Development Award Thursday from former U.N. ambassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick at a luncheon at the Hyatt Regency, Capitol Hill. Reynolds will be the second person to receive the award from OEF International, formerly the Overseas Education Fund. The first was former senator Charles Percy.

The award is presented for her efforts to improve the status of women worldwide while maintaining her business career. Reynolds is president of Wexler Reynolds Harrison and Shule, a public affairs firm. A close friend of First Lady Nancy Reagan, Reynolds was also a delegate to the U.N. Commission on the Status of Women.

Also being honored at the luncheon will be Sens. Joseph R. Biden Jr. and Claiborne Pell, authors of the Biden-Pell Amendment, which provides grants through the U.S. Agency for International Development to educate Americans about the implications for this country of hunger and poverty overseas. Some of the guests expected at the luncheon include Patricia Murphy Derian, former assistant secretary of state for human rights; Peace Corps Director Loret Miller Ruppe; D.C. Councilwoman Betty Ann Kane; and Rep. Claudine Schneider. End Notes

Florida Sen. Paula Hawkins returned home Friday wearing a brace after a month-long stay at Duke University Medical Center in Durham, N.C., where she underwent two operations to relieve back and neck pain. She said she plans to resume her reelection campaign against Democratic challenger Gov. Bob Graham on June 1 after resting and receiving therapy at her home in Winter Park . . .

Henry Taylor, the American University professor who recently won the Pulitzer Prize for poetry for his book "The Flying Change," was off camera waiting to be interviewed for a television show with poet Gwendolyn Brooks, a 1950 Pulitzer Prize winner. Taylor reminded Brooks that he had participated in a poetry-writing workshop she taught in 1966 at Indiana University. He was prepared and had with him the certificate she signed 20 years ago awarding him first place in the "most promising work in progress" . . .

When Paul Gerdon, the popular owner of the now closed Windsor McKay bar, died of complications of obesity in 1984, his family and friends said he delayed going to the hospital because he couldn't face the humiliation of being moved about on the makeshift, industrial-type carts that were the only conveyances big enough to hold him. That brought about the formation of the Paul Gerdon Foundation to raise money to buy oversized stretchers, beds and other equipment for Georgetown University Hospital. The foundation's third fundraiser tonight at Numbers is to bring out two members of Bruce Springsteen's E Street Band, Clarence Clemons and Nils Lofgren. There is, however, little chance that Springsteen himself will be there . . .

If that vivacious young woman serving french fries at the Roy Rogers restaurant on Wisconsin Avenue near Tenley Circle looks familiar, she is. Singer Marie Osmond, who is in town as cochair and host of the Children's Miracle Network Telethon, is to be selling french fries late this morning as part of the restaurant's "Buy a Large Fry, Help a Small Fry" promotion. The annual telethon benefits 110 children's hospitals throughout the United States, and much of the money raised comes through local business promotions . . .

Who would have thought Joan Rivers was that sentimental about marriage? While doing her act Friday at Caesars Palace, Rivers began talking to a young Phoenix couple -- Victoria Vincent, 29, and Michael Nick, 27 -- in the audience. She asked if they were married, and when she learned that they were not but had been together 10 years, she said it was about time they married, and she offered to be maid of honor. "Just give me an hour's notice, tell me where, and I'll be there," Rivers said. The couple thought about it through the night, and on Saturday night they were married at the Little Chapel of the West with maid-of-honor Rivers dabbing her eyes . . .