Celebrities from show business, sports, politics and the media were seen throughout the city last night at 14 dinner parties for the Women's Campaign Fund. The annual spring event, which includes a reception as well as the dinner parties, is to raise money to support progressive Democratic and Republican candidates running for public office.

Among the special guests at the dinner parties were author William Styron and poet Rose Styron, cartoonist Garry Trudeau, columnist Mark Shields, actresses Joanne Woodward, Karen Akers and Brooke Adams, Sens. William Cohen, Christopher Dodd, Frank Lautenberg, John Kerry, Thomas Harkin, Paul Simon and Daniel Patrick Moynihan, as well as sports figures Paul Warfield, George Starke and Lee Elder. New Research on FDR's Health

A University of Kansas professor of history and medicine says he believes President Franklin D. Roosevelt had cancer and heart disease in the years before his death and that his illnesses were concealed to protect him during his 1944 reelection campaign. Dr. Robert P. Hudson, who is also president of the American Association for the History of Medicine, said he has researched Roosevelt's last illness for seven years.

He contends the brain hemorrhage that killed the president in April 1945 can be attributed to a malignant brain tumor or severe cardiovascular disease, "both of which, in my opinion, he suffered," Hudson said. He contends that Roosevelt's cancer was discovered in the spring of 1944 while he was seeking an unprecedented fourth term, and that the president's personal physician, Vice Adm. Ross McIntire, "repeatedly deceived the public" by denying Roosevelt's health was any cause for concern. End Notes

With so many nervous world travelers this summer, the Defense Department is publishing "Safety Tips for Safe Travel," which gives advice on how to avoid or minimize trouble with terrorists. For example, sidewalk cafe's are to be avoided, as well as places frequented by Americans and other westerners. That takes in a number of major attractions. The pamphlet was originally intended for Defense employes and families, but will be available at the end of the month for other travelers. There was growing public interest in the publication following reports that one like it was given to White House employes and members of the press traveling with President Reagan on his Southeast Asia trip. There is no indication where it is printed, so if a traveler is seen consulting the pamphlet, the watching terrorist won't know it is a government document. It is available from Defense's public affairs office . . .

It's clearly a symbol of the 1980s. Restaurateur Mo Sussman is officially opening his Bethesda branch of Joe and Mo's tomorrow, even though the new restaurant has been having a trial run this week. When Sussman decided to look for the first dollar to frame and hang behind the bar, he learned that the first customer paid with his American Express credit card. Being a man of his time, Sussman is going to frame the American Express receipt instead . . .

Michael Jackson made a brief appearance yesterday in New York to renew his Pepsi-Cola partnership with a contract that the Los Angeles Times reported Monday is actually worth $50 million, with an initial up-front payment to the singer of $10 million to $15 million. Jackson, wearing his signature sunglasses and military uniform, showed up at the Red Parrot nightclub for about five minutes, but refused to take questions from the press.

The late actor James Cagney left everything in his will to his wife of 64 years, Frances (Willie) Cagney, but left nothing to his only living child, adopted daughter Cathleen Cagney Thomas, and his grandchildren. There was no reason for the exclusion in the will dated March 1982 other than, "I have intentionally made no provision for any grandchild of mine because I believe it is the obligation of each parent to adequately provide for his own children during the parent's lifetime just as I have done, and just as I believe my children should do for their children" . . .

The Soviet Union unsuccessfully attempted to prevent a performance in Istanbul this week by Soviet-born defector Rudolph Nureyev. The Soviets made the appeal directly to the Turkish government. Nureyev is directing and performing in the Istanbul State Opera and Ballet's production of Tchaikovsky's "Sleeping Beauty," which opened in Istanbul Sunday. Turkey told the Soviets the government saw Nureyev's performance purely from an artistic and not a political point of view . . .

The vegetable-hating children of the world should not hear this story. Barbara Bush, the wife of Vice President George Bush, was speaking at a Republican breakfast Monday when she related how a woman wrote asking for some of her husband's favorite recipes. Vegetables were not included, she explained, because two years ago when the vice president turned 60 he said, "I'm never going to eat broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower or cabbage again." And, she added, "he hasn't."