In a season of glamorous Kennedy-family weddings, Saturday's Georgetown wedding of Timothy Shriver, the 26-year-old son of Sargent and Eunice Shriver, to attorney Linda Potter, 29, came off without the media crush such events usually provoke. Nearly 400 guests were there to see the ecumenical ceremonies that included one conducted outside Georgetown University's Dahlgren Chapel by New York Episcopal Bishop Paul Moore and another inside the chapel by the Rev. Richard Fragomeni, the former director of liturgy for the Diocese of Albany and a doctoral candidate at Catholic University.

Two bagpipers and a drummer played outside the chapel. Following Bishop Moore's ceremony Shriver, escorted by his parents, and Potter, escorted by hers, Robert and Isabel Potter, went into the chapel for the second ceremony. They were followed by the assembled guests and friends. The reception was held at the McLean home of the bride's parents.

The wedding party included 15 bridesmaids and 15 groomsmen. There were four best men: John Kennedy Jr. and Timothy's brothers Robert, Mark and Anthony. (The brothers have all pledged to be each other's best men.) Timothy's sister, "CBS Morning News" coanchor Maria Shriver, whose April wedding in Hyannis Port, Mass., was a media event, was matron of honor. Her new husband, actor Arnold Schwarzenegger, was filming on location and wasn't at Saturday's wedding. The wedding brought out Kennedys and friends, including Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, Sen. Edward Kennedy, Pat Lawford, Jean Kennedy Smith and Ethel Kennedy; Caroline Kennedy, who will be marrying Edwin Schlossberg (who was there) later this summer; a number of Timothy's Yale classmates including groomsman Dino Bradlee; columnist Art Buchwald, George and Liz Stevens and Vernon Jordan, former head of the Urban League.

Shriver, who is finishing work on a master's degree at Georgetown, works in the New Haven, Conn., public school system with underachieving children from low-income families. Potter, a Georgetown graduate with a law degree from Vanderbilt University, worked for the Washington law firm of Latham Watkins & Hills.

End Notes

At the small party in the Kennedy Center's Golden Circle Lounge on opening night of "The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial," Ben Cross, who plays the tough defense attorney whose penetrating grilling breaks the infamous Capt. Queeg, walked quickly across the room to catch the play's author, Herman Wouk. Cross was carrying a 1954 Fireside Club edition of the play with a photograph of the original cast, which included the late Lloyd Nolan as Queeg and the late Henry Fonda in the Capt. Greenwald role that Cross plays. In the back row of the cast photograph was a young actor in a nonspeaking role: James Baumgardner, now better known as James Garner. Cross asked Wouk to autograph it, and he wrote: "This is to let you know you have become an official plank-owner of the USS Caine." A plank-owner, in Navy parlance, is one who has been on a ship since it was commissioned. Cross said yesterday he was flattered by Wouk's inscription, especially coming on top of other opening-night accolades . . .

One of those moments in history that must be recorded for all mankind took place Saturday: It was the 21st birthday party at the Palladium Club for model, starlet and Princeton student Brooke Shields. A baby elephant named Caron was there when bare-chested, muscle-beach types in gold Egyptian headdresses brought in the birthday cake shaped like a white sphinx and bearing 21 candles. The Egyptian theme wasn't explained . . .

It's clearly that time of year. Reza Pahlavi, 26, the oldest son of the late shah of Iran, announced his engagement to marry Yasmine Amini, 20, whom he met in California. She is the daughter of an Iranian businessman. A time or location for the wedding wasn't revealed, but it is thought it might take place in this country later in the summer . . .

Former Senate majority leader Howard Baker's campaign for the Republican presidential nomination is temporarily on hold. Newsweek magazine reports that he has called a halt to his campaign because his wife, Joy, a recovered alcoholic, is suffering from a painful back condition that is baffling doctors . . .

Another one of those hard-to-believe facts. Had Marilyn Monroe lived, she would have celebrated her 60th birthday yesterday. It's hard to think of her as ever being that old . . .

It doesn't pay to mess with Clint Eastwood, and now that he has political power it's a lot easier to make his day. The new mayor of Carmel-by-the Sea, Calif., whose battle with the town's planning commission prompted his run for mayor, has named four new commissioners to the seven-member body. He has the authority to replace the whole commission if he choses. One of the remaining commissioners called the move "an out-and-out vendetta." Eastwood was his usual taciturn self: unavailable for comment . . .