Don't forget, Royal Wedding fans, that the nuptials go on the air at 5:30 tomorrow morning on ABC, CBS, NBC, Cable News Network and Lifetime cable . . .

The last three days and nights of the Goodwill Games from Moscow this weekend didn't exactly keep Washington audiences glued to their setskis . . .

Keeping in mind that a single ratings point represents about 15,000 TV dachas in the Washington market, Friday afternoon coverage on Channel 50 averaged a 0.5 Nielsen rating (or 7,500 homes) and a 2 percent audience share. Evening coverage rose to 0.9/2, while late-night highlights did a 0.8/4 . . .

Six hours of coverage Saturday afternoon on WFTY averaged a 0.3/1, the evening leaped to a 1.2/3 and the late-night recap fell back to a 0.2/1 (or about 3,000 dachas) . . .

Sunday afternoon ceremonies got a 0.5/1 while the evening recap did a 0.4/1 . . .

In Nielsen's 12 major markets (including Washington) the daytime and nighttime Friday shows averaged a 1.3/5 and a 2.3/4 while the late night in eight markets did a 1.5/5 . . .

Saturday, it was 1.9/6, 2.5/5 and 1.2/5 in the respective time periods and on Sunday it was 2.5/8 and 2.4/5 . . .

The national ratings -- which determine the real audience -- will be out on Thursday . . .

Since Turner Broadcasting System had promised sponsors a minimum 5 rating, advertisers will get "make good" advertising spots on other TBS programs . . .

President Reagan's speech on South Africa, which he will deliver to a White House audience today at 2 p.m., can be seen live on Cable News Network. The Democratic response will air at 4 p.m. . . .

Channel 26 will air a tape of the speech and the response starting at 11 p.m. . . .

It's taken about four months, but Channel 5 has a new sports director to replace Bernie Smilovitz . . .

He's Joe Fowler, most recently a sportscaster with KMOX in St. Louis, an American University grad and former WAMU announcer . . .

He'll handle the Monday-Friday week night chores starting Aug. 4. Since Smilovitz defected to WDIV in Detroit, weekend sportscaster Steve Buckhantz has been filling in the weeknight spot . . .

And Channel 4 announces that Tod Mesirow has become a producer in the programming department . . .

He comes from "Capital Edition" on Channel 9 -- where he had been a writer, field producer and editor and where he won an Emmy . . . Moving Slowly Along

In this heat, one of the few new ABC series that ad agency analysts think have a chance to make it this fall -- as long as it remains up against NBC's "1986" at 10 p.m. on Tuesdays, anyway -- is "Our Kind of Town" . . .

It stars Shelley Hack as a Chicago columnist named Jacki and Tom Mason as Mike, her husband, the restaurant developer . . .

Yesterday, from the Mysterious West, came the announcement that ABC has changed the title to "Jack and Mike" . . .

Negotiations between Cap Cities/ABC Inc. and "Good Morning America" host David Hartman have begun. David's contract is up Nov. 1 . . .

Network executives insist they want David to stay, but they're also going to insist that David relinquish editorial and production control of the morning show, a perk he won a few years ago from the old ABC management. Cap Cities prefers a tighter ship . . .

On another wicket, you may recall that Cap Cities/ABC management shocked its 212 affiliates on the eve of the early June affiliates meeting in L.A., by announcing unilaterally that the network was no longer going to pay stations to carry its NFL "Monday Night Football" games . . .

Instead, the network would create a 6 1/2-minute news window at half time, three minutes of which would go to local news and would include a minute of advertising time not previously available for sale by local stations . . .

A lot of the affiliates didn't like the plan, in part because the action was proposed without discussion and in part because smaller markets prefer to get paid to carry the games (while big markets, like Washington, can make more money from ads than from compensation) . . .

A compromise was finally worked out: The network, which had previously paid stations for carrying the two primetime hours of the game, will pay just one hour of compensation instead, while still inaugurating the half-time news window and that extra minute of time to sell ads . . .

It's still the tip of a mighty big iceberg. Each of the three networks currently pays affiliates about $150 million annually to carry its programs . . .

As it becomes more clear that the competitive independent stations, cable systems and would-be networks will be hard pressed to come up with the money to match the fresh programming that is paid for and delivered daily by the networks, executives at NBC and CBS, as well as at ABC, are beginning to wonder why they should, in addition, pay stations to carry their shows (one quick answer from affiliates: A lot of the network product is pretty lousy) . . .

A CBS executive who knows precisely what every program costs suggested to us last month in Los Angeles that as the economics of the whole industry shake down, the time may come when the affiliates will have to pay the networks . . .

Neither CBS nor NBC ("that's a hot potato," says Chairman Grant Tinker) will talk in public about it, but in five or 10 years, should TV production costs continue to rise, this first move by Cap Cities -- stuck with a money-losing Monday night football package -- could be regarded as a watershed . . .

Which reminds us, Ad Age says Fox Broadcasting may make a pass at the Monday night NFL game if ABC bows out of its contract after this season. ABC lost $40 million on the NFL series last year and expects to lose millions again in 1986 . . .

One of the Fox stations: Channel 5 here . . . Sports Emmys

ABC Sports, with 30, leads the nomination list for the Sports Emmy Awards, winners of which will be announced early next month . . .

Independent producers are next with 12, NBC Sports follows with nine, and CBS has two . . .

None of the networks fully endorses the annual Sports Emmy Awards sponsored by the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences -- arguments over judging methods and categories persist -- but all three permit producers and talent to submit candidate shows . . .

Since the eligibility period for the upcoming awards runs from April 1, 1984, to March 31, 1985, it includes the Summer Olympics and Super Bowl 19, both of which were produced by ABC. Hence the large total from that network . . .

Among the nominees for Outstanding Sports Personality (Host) are George Michael of NBC (and WRC here) and Kathleen Sullivan of the ABC News Washington bureau, along with ABC's Curt Gowdy . . .

Michael is also named in the Special Classification -- Individual Achievement category for NBC's "Baseball Fantasy." In the same category, there were also two nominations for "The George Michael Sports Machine" . . .