Trekkies of the world unite: The Soviet Union is about to be introduced to "Star Trek." And officials from the World Wildlife Fund, headquartered here, will attend the Soviet premiere of the movie "Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home" later this month. Dr. Spock himself, who directed the film and starred in it under his real name, Leonard Nimoy, will be there, along with producer Harve Bennett, Wildlife Fund Vice President Tom Lovejoy and the fund's whale expert Roger Payne.

The movie's Soviet debut will be part of a week-long series of events beginning June 26 in Moscow. Attending will be Soviet scientists, conservationists and filmmakers. The conference is designed to focus attention on international conservation efforts to save whales and other endangered species. The Soviet Union's last whaling expedition ended in March and the government has declared its intention to abide by the International Whaling Commission's moratorium on hunting the great sea animals. The plot of the "Star Trek" movie has humpback whales brought forward in time from the 20th century to save the earth. Once the Soviets have seen Dr. Spock's pointy ears, "Star Trek" may have a whole new audience in the U.S.S.R.

The Missing Manuscript Come July, The Washingtonian will publish an article by David Halevy and Neil C. Livingstone titled "Mr. Goode: The Passionate Odyssey of Oliver North," but right now the magazine's concern is that no one else publish it first. One of three copies of the 142-page manuscript was stolen from The Washingtonian's office sometime between 6:30 and 10:30 on the evening of May 27, and a letter has gone out to half a dozen news organizations to whom the culprit might offer the story, alerting them to the theft.

The thief apparently tried first to photocopy it, but the machine ran out of paper. Executive Editor John Sansing says the story deals "with further undisclosed activities of Oliver North, especially vis-a`-vis his Israeli connection." Halevy has been in the middle of controversial stories before: He contributed significantly to the Time magazine story over which then defense minister Ariel Sharon sued, and lost, for libel. Livingstone, a counterterrorist security expert, tried to see the bright side of the theft. He told Washingtonian editors, "Maybe I could sell you a security system over there."

Out and About

For anyone who has noticed Lynda Carter spending so much time dropping into maternity shops and looking at nursery furniture around town, it's as you might have thought. She and her husband, attorney and First American Security President Robert Altman, are expecting their first child sometime in January. Carter's plans for a summer concert tour and the start of a new television situation comedy are likely to be postponed, at least until after the baby is born ...

Virginia Gov. Gerald Baliles makes his film debut today, but he'll be portraying a congressman. Virginia has been actively working to attract movie productions to the state, and Richmond is currently playing Atlanta in the filming of an NBC mini-series starring Jack Lemmon and produced by George Stevens Jr. Called "The Ballad of Mary Phagan," it's the story of the famous case involving Leo Frank, a Georgia pencil manufacturer who was lynched in 1913 after being convicted in the murder of a teen-age girl. Baliles appears as an extra playing a Virginia congressman in the trial sequence to be filmed today. Since being a politician is so similar to being an actor, Baliles is simply expanding his options ...

Diners at the Jockey Club were awestruck but quiet Tuesday night at seeing superstar Elizabeth Taylor dining there with polio vaccine developer Dr. Jonas Salk. The couple sat in the restaurant talking for nearly four hours ...

President and Nancy Reagan are about to get a new chef to prepare their private meals. Annapolis native Steve Junta, 24, who has been a chef at the Amway Grand Plaza Hotel in Grand Rapids, Mich., is to start the job next month. He's a specialist on seafoods, so there could be a lot of fish and shellfish in the president's future diet ...

Ford's Theatre is just beginning to put together its lineup of stars for its annual black-tie gala, to be held June 21. The cohosts for the evening will be "Golden Girl" Bea Arthur and hot property Michael J. Fox. The only performers booked so far are songwriter Sammy Cahn, American Ballet Theatre dancers, jazz saxophonist David Sanborn and a special, but not performing, appearance by Mikhail Baryshnikov. President and Nancy Reagan are expected and there will be a tribute in the first lady's honor. The show is usually taped for telecast later in the year, but Ford's doesn't have a network agreement yet for this year's production ...