For people who'd like a part of history, no matter how bizarre, Gary Hart's town house may be available to rent or buy. That's the famous Capitol Hill town house where the man who would be president spent, or didn't spend (depending on who's telling the story), part of a weekend with Miami model Donna Rice. And the Hart bid for the Democratic presidential nomination ended there.

An agent at Robinson Real Estate here said the former senator's wife Lee contacted Terri Robinson, a longtime family friend, and expressed a desire to rent her former home, which is on Sixth Street SE. It is a three-story town house with two bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, two fireplaces and, as nearly everyone must know by now, a rear garage that Miami Herald reporters neglected to keep their eyes on. The Harts plan to remain at home in Colorado. A Robinson agent, who would not identify himself, estimated the house might rent for $2,200 a month or sell, if the Harts decide to put it on the market, in the $350,000-to-$375,000 range. There is, of course, the priceless conversational value of calling that particular town house home. Out and About His uncle may have successfully opposed the nomination of Assistant Attorney General William Bradford Reynolds for the Justice Department's No. 3 job in 1985, but John F. Kennedy Jr. has taken a summer job at Reynolds' civil rights division as a $353-a-week law clerk. A spokeswoman said Reynolds himself made the decision to hire Kennedy, who will spend the summer rotating with six other clerks through different sections of the division ...

That Nashville radio station that got President Reagan to record a promotional endorsement for "the 50,000-watt blowtorch of the South" has continued to broadcast the unique plug even though the White House has objected to it. The president had read the endorsement at a May 15 press conference. Jerry Dahmen, the WSM-AM news director, felt it was all in good fun and had no apologies after the White House protest. He did say that the radio spot will now be used only sparingly, since it has gone stale with frequent use ...

Jim Zogby, executive director of the Arab American Institute, decided to host a party yesterday that almost didn't come off. It was in honor of Tom Hazouri, a fellow Arab American and the newly elected mayor of Jacksonville, Fla. Included on the guest list were Jesse Jackson and several labor leaders. When Zogby called Jackson to invite him to the reception, the candidate said he couldn't come because the event was being held at the Henley Park, a nonunion hotel often picketed by the Hotel Employees and Restaurant Employees International Union. Zogby, who said he hadn't been aware the hotel was nonunion, found that other invited guests, including his guest of honor, wouldn't cross a picket line. At the last minute yesterday, Zogby changed the reception to his 16th Street office and his problems were solved. Even Jackson said he would be there ...

Big-band leader Woody Herman was released from Sinai Hospital in Detroit yesterday, where he had spent four months being treated for a heart ailment and congested lungs. The 74-year-old clarinetist was to perform at Blues Alley June 30 with his Thundering Herd. Herman's band will still perform at the Georgetown jazz club, though longtime band member Frank Tiberi will lead while Herman recovers at home in Los Angeles. Tony Wheelock, a spokesman for Blues Alley, said the club is planning to send a giant get-well card to the jazz legend to be signed by Mayor Marion Barry, Rep. John Conyers and other members of Congress as well as radio jazz disc jockeys Felix Grant of WWRC, Paul Anthony of WGMS, Rusty Hassan of WAMU and Bill Scanlan of WWDC-AM ...

A Japanese firm reportedly almost bought the Beverly Hills home where Rock Hudson died of AIDS. A newly formed private trust, however, outbid the Japanese firm and will pay $2.89 million for the mansion, which has a swimming pool, greenhouse, theater with its own stage and six-car garage. The trust that bought the house would not reveal the owners' names, but assured it would remain a private residence. The Japanese firm, U.S. Kurasawa, had planned to use the estate as living quarters for its executives when they visited Los Angeles ...