Peter Fannon, who has been president of the National Association of Public Television Stations for the past three years, yesterday informed the NAPTS board he intends to step down at the end of August ...

A search committee is expected to begin interviewing candidates for the job later this summer ...

Fannon was in at the beginning in 1979 when NAPTS was formed to be the lobbying arm of public television in its dealings with Congress ...

He had been director of planning and assistant to the vice chairman of PBS when he was named general manager of NAPTS in 1979. Earlier he had been with the Office of Management and Budget ...

In accepting his resignation yesterday, NAPTS chairman Richard O. Ottinger called Fannon "one of the brightest men in public broadcasting, whose extraordinary talents have helped make public broadcasting stronger and better; he will be very much missed" ...

Ottinger had praise for Fannon's efforts to bring public TV back from the brink when the federal government had reduced its annual contribution to only $137 million four years ago ...

Fannon said yesterday he has "no plans to announce" regarding his future. "I figured that after eight years it's a good time to be moving on" ...

There have been rumors for a number of months, within the tight little PBS Establishment, that the NAPTS board has wanted to make some key management changes, anticipating a different direction for the organization ...

Oh, sure, they won't start tapping the tambourines out at Channel 26 until mid-August (Aug. 16, to be exact), but WETA isn't letting us forget that it will be trying to raise $320,000 when The Time Comes ...

Or that WETA has created "Pledge Takes a Holiday," a whole week of the two-week drive that would be virtually devoid of on-air pitches for money if enough corporations agree to pick up the tab -- perhaps $100,000 of it, anyway -- during that week ...

Yesterday, the station announced that Sovran Bank, Cellular One, The George Hyman Construction Co. and MCI have already agreed to underwrite portions of "Pledge Takes a Holiday" and WETA is looking for a few more good corporations to help out ...

Also in the News Because of a couple of bookkeeping errors, there have been some very slight revisions in the local Emmy count announced Saturday night at the annual awards ...

The annual prizes are distributed under the auspices of the Washington chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences ...

In the revised count, NBC-owned WRC won in 21 categories, which were worth a total of 30 Emmy statuettes. WUSA was second with 18 category wins and (as its Instant On-Air Promo Ad was claiming on Sunday) 31 statuettes; followed by WJLA with 12 (16), WTTG with 9 (11) and independent producers three (worth four statuettes) ...

WJLA, like WUSA, is already on the air with its Emmy Winners promo and WRC and WTTG should be on line any minute now ...

Just to keep the winning in some kind of perspective, WUSA originally submitted 187 entries, followed by WTTG with 108, WRC with 106, WJLA with 86, WHMM with 51, WETA with 14, WDCA with 10 and independents with 29 ...

Of those totals, WUSA had 63 entries nominated; WRC, 47; WJLA, 32; WTTG, 24; independents, 14; WHMM, 2; WETA, 2; and WDCA, 1 ...

In the list of winners run on this page yesterday, "Say No to Drugs" producer Fran Seegar, WJLA, should have been included among the winners in the broadcast image, public image category ...

Among news series: "My Child Is Gay," Marjorie Margulies, Mike Kiernan, Joe Hearn, producers, should have been credited to WRC. And David Satchell's win in the individual achievement, editing programming category, should have been credited to WTTG ...

Kung But Not Forgotten: "CBS Summer Playhouse" aired another pilot that didn't make the fall schedule on Friday night and the voters who phoned in loved it, giving "Kung Fu: The Next Generation" 87,173 "yes" votes and a mere 2,860 "noes" ...

Viewers in general weren't quite so ecstatic, voting strongly for ABC's "Sledge Hammer" and "Mr. Belvedere" in the same time period while giving "Kung" only an 8.6 national Nielsen rating and a 19 percent audience share ...

CBS' "West 57th" averaged a 7.7/16 in 14 major Nielsen markets Saturday night at 10. According to the Airwaves Abacus, which is not always reliable in this hot weather since Airwaves' fingers tend to get slippery, this portends a better finish than last week for "West" in its new timeslot ...

NBC isn't going to be as much fun to visit anymore. And neither will Seoul, Korea, which wasn't promising to be a barrel of laughs next summer, anyway ...

Alan Baker, who has been the network's vice president for the media for the 1988 Summer Olympics, is taking advantage of a lucrative buyout and will leave at the end of July ...

The news is out about Baker's availability and he's already considering three different job offers ... none of which is expected to interfere seriously with his busy off-duty schedule attending first nights on Broadway, museum exhibit openings and lecture series ...

Baker joined NBC as a page in 1956. After laboring without a whimper in the network press department for years, he escaped to Madison Square Garden, where, as a vice president, he helped the Knicks to an NBA championship in 1970. After a variety of top PR jobs (at Hertz and TAT Communications), he returned to NBC in 1977 as director of information for the 1980 Summer Olympics, a project that died when President Carter banned U.S. athletes from competing in Moscow ...

In case you haven't heard, Donna Rice's appearance on ABC's "20/20" Thursday night with Barbara Walters helped the program to an 18.2 national Nielsen average and a 32 percent audience ...

During the first half hour, in which Gary Hart's former companion appeared, the show averaged an 18.5/33 ...

ABC research said 23 million viewers watched and it was the highest-rated "20/20" since March a year ago ...

Channel 7 got some good news last week during the Broadcast Promotion Managers convention in Atlanta ...

Film critics Siskel and Ebert, who did their annual review of promos from around the country, gave Seven's "Magnum Paradise" promos four stars ...

As a result, MCA, which syndicates "Magnum, P.I." around the country, is negotiating with Seven to use the ads at other stations carrying the popular reruns ...

The promo was produced in house by WJLA's Coby Leyden and Mark Davidson. The music was written and produced by Marvin Himmelfarb of Hot Spot Production in Los Angeles ...

Maria Shriver, who has added the anchor job on NBC's "Main Street" to her assignment as co-anchor of "Sunday Today," is serving all this week as Jane Pauley's replacement on the "Today" show ...

And Finally The 62-member board of directors of the National Association of Broadcasters is in town for its semi-annual meeting ...

Tomorrow morning, the NAB board, representing 930 TV stations and more than 4,900 radio outlets, will hear from Vice President George Bush ...

And at tomorrow's luncheon, Senate Majority Leader Robert Byrd will receive a plaque "in appreciation of his leadership in bringing broadcast coverage of Senate proceedings to the American people" ...

Tonight, at the Library of Congress, more than 50 congressional wives will preview audio and video public service announcements they have taped on the dangers of drug abuse among young people, and the second spot in recognition of the bicentennial celebration of the Constitution. Each spot features a member of the Congressional Families for Drug-Free Youth ...

The PSAs are a joint effort of the NAB, the Congressional Families organization and the U.S. Bicentennial Commission ...