ANIMATION ADDICTS, Wednesday night's for you. The National Museum of American History will show animated films from 11 countries at 7:30 in Baird Auditorium. The program will be introduced by Charles Samu, an executive producer at Home Box Office and International Animation Association board member; he has selected Oscar-nominated and festival-winning movies from the United States, Austria, Bulgaria, Canada, Greece, Holland, Israel, Japan, Poland, the Soviet Union and Sweden. Admission is $5.

D.C. is making a local hit of 84 Charing Cross Road, the literary penpal love story starring Anne Bancroft and Anthony Hopkins. Attendance figures at the MacArthur have doubled over the last two weekends (from 1,200 to last weekend's 2,250), says Circle Theaters spokesman Freeman Fisher. Surprised distributor Columbia Pictures is sending out a second print, opening at the Avalon Friday. It should be some consolation for "84" producer Mel Brooks, who has the unenviable task of awaiting box-office returns for "Spaceballs". . .

This is definitely British playwright Joe Orton's year, with the publication of his diaries, as well as the release of Prick Up Your Ears, Stephen Frears' fascinating film about Orton's fatal love affair with Kenneth Halliwell. Friday night at 8:15, the American Film Institute will launch a "Preview Review" series with a film adaptation of an Orton play double-billed with a 1983 Frears film. In Frears' Loving Walter, Shakespearean heavyweight Ian McKellen plays a mentally retarded adult forced into an institution when his parents die. It is followed by Douglas Hickox's 1970 version of Orton's Entertaining Mr. Sloane, with Beryl Reid (known in England as a Margaret Dumont figure in the perennial "Carry On" comedy films) and Brit screen veteran Harry Andrews . . .

The AFI takes the Bob 'n' Bing road Saturday (at 3:15) with a double of Road to Bali and Road to Singapore. All seven road pix will be shown between July and September. AFI also salutes the late Rita Hayworth with showings of Gilda (this Sunday at 6), The Lady from Shanghai, The Strawberry Blonde, Only Angels Have Wings, You'll Never Get Rich, You Were Never Lovelier, Pal Joey, My Gal Sal and Cover Girl, as well as her title portrayal in Miss Sadie Thompson (to be shown in the original 3-D process) . . . A. Martin Zweiback didn't like the way Anthony Harvey shot his script for the 1983 Katharine Hepburn-Nick Nolte film The Ultimate Solution of Grace Quigly. So Zweibeck bought the film rights and recut the dang thing himself. Sunday at 8, he'll be there to show his version; it's not often a screenwriter gets the last word. All events are $4.50 for nonmembers.

Friday at noon, filmmaker Andrew Kolker shows American Tongues, his exploration of the varieties of spoken English. At Baird Auditorium, free . . . Friday night at 9:25 (as well as 7:30 Saturday and 6:30 Sunday), Sidwell Cinema at Sidwell Friends School shows Eve of Destruction, an assemblage of antiwar and black-power films of the '60s. Admission is $3.50; call 537-8135.