CBS News' two-hour special Wednesday night, "The Soviet Union: Seven Days in May," had a 12.7 national Nielsen rating and a 23 percent audience share ...

The special outdrew reruns of both "MacGyver" and "Hotel" on ABC and the NBC lineup between 9 and 11 that night ...

In Washington, "Seven Days in May" attracted a 19.0/33 on Channel 9, easily beating the local competition during the two hours ...

In case you're warming up the pocket computer over breakfast, a national Nielsen rating point represents 874,000 TV homes; a Washington point represents 15,800 ...

CBS announced yesterday there will be no more "news breaks" at 9:58 p.m. on weeknights when the fall season begins in late September ...

The 60-second news inserts -- which include 15 seconds of advertising -- have been on the air since 1977. The year before, CBS had discovered, with its "Bicentennial Minutes," that there was advertising money to be made with the informational breaks ...

But after nine years, too many of CBS' 202 affiliates have decided to use the 60 seconds for their own news breaks, keeping the revenue from 15-second ads for themselves. Currently, only 62 percent of the country is covered by the network news breaks and advertisers have lost interest ...

Among the 57 stations that no longer clear the network news breaks are affiliates in major markets like San Francisco, Detroit, Miami and Boston ...

In the fall, the network will add the 45 seconds to regular programming and keep the 15-second advertising slot for itself ...

The weekend primetime sports breaks will continue, however ...

The weeknight news breaks emanate from the CBS News Washington bureau and have been rotated among network correspondents over the years ...

Jack Smith, CBS bureau chief here, said yesterday, "We hate to lose them" ...

A week ago, ABC informed its affiliates of the cancellation of both its weeknight "Business Briefs" and the weekend "Sports Update" when the fall rolls around ...

In Other News CBS Entertainment yesterday announced that "Houston Nights" will return to the schedule on Tuesday, July 28 -- the night the series will air in the new fall season ...

The reruns will begin with the original two-hour pilot that night, starting at 9 p.m., and will air at 9 p.m. for the next seven weeks ...

Starting Tuesday, Aug. 4, all new episodes of "Night Heat" will begin airing in the 10 p.m. time slot ...

The "CBS Tuesday Movie" will thus have its final broadcast on July 14. The Miss Teen USA pageant airs the night of July 21, as previously announced ...

CBS also announced that the "CBS Thursday Movie" will debut with a rerun of "All the Right Moves" on July 2, replacing "Simon & Simon" and "The Twilight Zone." The latter moves to Friday at 10 for four weeks starting Friday, July 10 ...

"Hard Copy," now seen in that time period, has its final broadcast on Friday, July 3 ...

As previously announced, "Adderly" joins the summer schedule on Fridays at 10, with all new broadcasts starting Aug. 7 and running through Sept. 11 ...

Incidentally, our Chateau Marmont Bureau Chief informs us that CBS has ordered additional "Twilight Zones" in order to complete a package of half-hour versions of the series for syndication sometime in the future ...

Labor News The National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians (NABET) moved closer to a projected Monday morning strike against NBC ...

This, despite reports that the 300-member Washington unit (Local 31 of NABET) is opposed to a Monday walkout and had sought to extend a strike deadline until Aug. 1 ...

Some 2,800 NBC employes nationwide belong to NABET, including camerapersons, newswriters, sound men, news assistants, technicians and maintenance workers ...

NABET members have been working without a contract since the previous four-year pact expired March 31. On June 18, NBC notified the union it intended to implement its final, March 31 offer for a two-year contract at 12:01 a.m. Monday, June 29 ...

The NABET negotiating committee responded by informing the network the union would strike at the time the offer was implemented ...

Two days earlier, the parties had met with a representative of the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. At that meeting, NABET negotiators told NBC they had some 200 changes to propose in the network offer. But NBC refused to discuss them because they were not in writing ...

Wednesday night, the Washington NABET unit met and in a stormy meeting reportedly recommended, by a 2-to-1 vote, that NABET leaders accept a cooling-off period during which they could reduce their proposals to writing for network consideration, among other moves. The Washington unit reportedly wanted NABET officials to notify other locals of the Local 31 proposal via telegram. Local 31 also sought an extension of the strike deadline to Aug. 1 ...

Sources indicate that some rank-and-file NABET members are irked that the rank and file has never seen the NBC final offer nor have been offered an opportunity to vote on it ...

Yesterday, there were unconfirmed reports that newswriters for both "NBC Nightly News" and the "Today" show are considering withdrawing from NABET if the strike takes place (newswriters at NBC in Washington belong to the American Federation of Television & Radio Artists) ...

Late yesterday, chief NABET network negotiator Thomas F. Kennedy rejected the Local 31 proposal and said it would have no impact on the negotiating committee as far as the June 29 strike call is concerned. It was unclear whether he had rejected Local 31's appeal to notify other NABET locals of the Washington proposal ...

Meanwhile, the National Labor Relations Board yesterday dismissed charges of unfair labor practices filed by NABET against NBC on April 15 ... as NABET rallies were held in New York, Chicago and Burbank ...

NABET spokesman John Krieger said late yesterday that union negotiators have scheduled a conference call for next Wednesday to discuss future actions, including a possible appeal of the NLRB decision ...

As for the NLRB decision, Krieger said, "We are obviously disappointed, but with the NLRB track record favoring management and big business during the Reagan administration, the decision of the board, although it is disappointing, is not totally unexpected" ...

Gene McGuire, executive vice president, personnel and labor relations, for NBC, said in a statement, regarding the strike, that "although we are fully prepared for such an eventuality we sincerely hope that it does not occur. Certainly we would have preferred a signed labor agreement between NBC and NABET. Since the March 31 expiration NABET-represented employes have been working without a contract. During that time the union leadership has never put the proposed contract before NABET members for a vote ...

"We feel the proposed contract represents changes which are important to the long-term health of NBC and that the contract constitutes a fair, reasonable and balanced agreement for the company, the union and our employes. We think that, given an opportunity to work under the new contract, union members will agree" ...