At the end of a week that saw the passing of Fred Astaire and Jackie Gleason, two show business giants who deserved to be known as legendary, the New York City Transit Authority has come up with the perfect memorial for Gleason. A bus depot will be named in his memory. Gleason, who died last week at 71, is best remembered as bus driver Ralph Kramden in his 1950s television show "The Honeymooners." A spokesman for the Transit Authority said, "Ralph Kramden really typified the New York City bus driver, and we just felt that we wanted to do something to honor Jackie Gleason for it." A sign will be hoisted over the Fifth Avenue bus depot in Brooklyn's Sunset Park section proclaiming the building the "Gleason Depot."

Gleason, a native New Yorker, would have appreciated it, even if as the spokesman said, "In hindsight I guess this should have been done when he was alive." Gleason's wife Marilyn pinned a final red carnation to the comedian's lapel before the casket was closed Friday for about 2,000 mourners to walk past. The funeral Mass was Saturday at St. Mary's Cathedral in Miami for about 100 family and friends. Audrey Meadows, who played Gleason's "Honeymooners" wife, held a red carnation at the service.

Astaire's private funeral was Wednesday for only immediate family, and it was decided that there will be no memorial service for the man who was Mr. Elegance and Sophistication.

Out and About

For all those Joe Theismann fans around town -- there reportedly are some -- his autobiography is coming out in August. According to the advance publicity, the former Washington Redskins quarterback writes about a serious gambling problem. He describes it as being as close to an addiction as anyone outside Gamblers Anonymous can get, and writes: "I lost as much as $10,000 in one six-week period of training camp. I even went to Vegas on my honeymoon. Some people do one thing on their wedding night. I went to the casino. By myself. And I never went back to the room that night." That should have been an early warning signal to his now ex-wife Shari Theismann ...

Imelda Marcos is not one to go quietly into her exile. During their long reign, she and her husband Ferdinand declared martial law in the Philippines, and after being kicked out, faced accusations they had looted the country's treasury of hundreds of millions of dollars. And now she has advice for President Reagan on how to be more successful in running the United States. In a Playboy magazine interview, she said he should follow her husband's example. "There should be one leader; too many cooks spoil the broth." And she added of the Iran-contra scandal: "Reagan's No. 1 oath is to protect America. And the system would not help, so he had to go the illegal way. But it was morally right" ...

That bitter alimony battle between "Dynasty" star Joan Collins and her estranged husband Peter Holm is heating up again and should prove to be a hot little show by the time it is all resolved. Collins' lawyer, the famed alimony specialist Marvin Mitchelson, has now claimed that paintings, furniture and prints worth about $100,000 were taken from his client's Hollywood estate. Holm, a Swedish businessman who managed Collins during their brief marriage (her fourth), described the charge as a "load of rubbish." Holm, who is seeking $80,000 a month in temporary support during the divorce settlement battle, had some problems with immigration when he flew from London to Los Angeles last week. Holm said it was because Collins' representatives said he was in the United States illegally. And so it goes, with more to come ...

A good political press secretary has to have a sense of humor about himself and especially about his boss. If Gary Hart had been elected president, there is every indication that his press secretary Kevin Sweeney might have been a very different White House spokesman. Speaking to broadcasters in West Palm Beach, Fla., this weekend, he said, "For me, coming to this state is sort of like coming to Graceland and seeing the King's {Elvis Presley's} grave." He said he wanted to see the Monkey Business, the famous boat where Hart's campaign faltered. He added that he has declined media requests for comment on other politicians' indiscretions, explaining, "I knew right away I was in danger of being typecast as a defender of adultery" ...