At last! Lt. Col. Oliver North will have something to play on that home video recorder he bought on New Year's Eve. A Chicago-based company, MPI Home Video, is putting together a 90-minute tape that will be shipped to stores by the end of this month, and Waldenbooks has already made a commitment to carry it. And Olliephiles can have it for only $19.95.

It won't be the full 30-plus hours of North's testimony, but as the video company's vice president said, "You can't get an in-depth look at Oliver North in 90 seconds on the news each night." For those who still read, by next Tuesday Pocket Books will publish, in one volume and with a first printing of 600,000, the complete text of Ollie North's testimony, entitled: "Taking the Stand: The Testimony of Lt. Col Oliver L. North." A Pocket Books spokesman said it didn't know how many pages the book will have, but it should make a good doorstop.

Out and About The Iran-contra hearings have been causing some unexpected reactions: Marine Corps recruiting seems to be up over last year's and more tourists are taking tours of the Pentagon. North apparently is making such an impression that a few good men want to join up so they can salute and charge up the hill, a` la Ollie. But the suspicion of Pentagon tour guides is that the big draw there is shredder-for-the-boss Fawn Hall. Tour guides say that visitors are asking, "Where's Fawn Hall? Can we see her?" North's former secretary and partner in concealing and destroying secret documents is not on the official tour. But unknown to the tour groups, they pass within 50 yards of where she works. She is on the fourth floor in Room 4E788, where she is a secretary to Chase Untermeyer, assistant Navy secretary for manpower and reserve affairs. Who knows? One tour group may see her running for a cup of coffee ...

The Atlanta branch of the NAACP is now demanding that local radio talk show host Ed Tyll be fired for calling Rep. John Lewis a moron and comparing him to Buckwheat, the black "Little Rascals" comedy character who couldn't speak plainly. Lewis has a slight speech impediment caused by a beating during civil rights demonstrations in the 1960s ...

William Shawn, the almost legendary former editor of The New Yorker magazine, has become a book editor for Farrar, Straus & Giroux. Roger W. Straus, president of the publishing company, said in making the announcement that he had offered the position to Shawn last February, shortly before Shawn was forced to leave the magazine he had edited for 35 years. The 79-year-old Shawn declined an offer to have his own imprint at the publishing house, saying, "I believe there should be only two names on the book, the author first and the publisher second" ...

In another major magazine change, Hamilton Fish III is announcing today that he will resign as publisher of The Nation, a position he has held for 10 years. Circulation of the 122-year-old magazine, described by its editor as "an independent, progressive, troublemaking journal of opinion," quadrupled since Fish took it over in 1977 to 85,000 paid readers weekly. Arthur Carter, who purchased the magazine in 1985 and owns 80 percent of it, will become the new publisher. Victor Navasky will continue as editor ...

Mortimer B. Zuckerman, the well-known rich and powerful owner of U.S. News & World Report, Atlantic Monthly and a variety of real estate interests, has some things to say about taxes. According to recent testimony in Boston, he hasn't paid federal income tax the past five years, claiming tens of millions of dollars in "paper losses" from various business ventures. But that doesn't mean the wealthy publisher-real estate magnate is against taxes. In a full-page editorial in the recent issue of U.S. News he points out: "The President has to recognize that Congress is entitled to a legitimate role in the formulation of the budget, and that means some higher taxes. To imply that the budget can be reduced, much less balanced, without increasing revenue is nothing but demagoguery" ...