Helen Bergan, a librarian at the D.C. Public Library, believes that a book she wrote may have helped raise money for the contras. Bergan said yesterday that she wrote a small book published by BioGuide Press in Alexandria titled "Where the Money Is: A Fund Raiser's Guide to the Rich." It simply tells who has the money and how to talk them into giving it away.

Bergan said she has learned through a San Francisco Chronicle story that fundraiser-for-the-contras Carl (Spitz) Channell used a San Francisco firm called Public Management Institute to find rich contributors for the contra cause. Bergan admits it may be stretching things, but she wonders why the San Francisco consulting group has ordered 500 copies of her book over the past year. The Chronicle has reported that Channell spent nearly $100,000 in consulting fees on Public Management, and Bergan mused that Channell "could have saved a lot of money if he had bought the book directly from me and saved all those consulting fees." Public Management, on the other hand, refuses to talk about it.

Ollie in Fun

He probably won't outsell "The Far Side," but Ollie North is a boon to the novelty business. Ollie North T-shirts, buttons, bumper stickers and other such things are beginning to outsell the hot Tammy Faye Bakker makeup-smeared T-shirt saying "I ran into Tammy Faye at the Mall." The hottest new T-shirt in town, manufactured by Dallas Alice of Rockville, is called "Ollie's Follies" and shows the famous Marine in a movie poster pose that has a lengthy cast of starring names, from shredder Fawn Hall to Secretary of State George Shultz and "introducing Ronald Reagan as the Commander in Chief."

Doug Macomber, owner of the novelty store Splash near Dupont Circle, said he has the Ollie North shirt on a sidewalk display and "it's crazy, people see it and just have to have it." He sold nearly four dozen of them yesterday. In Georgetown, the Washington Inkwell novelty store says it sells out of all the Ollie North items -- such as buttons, T-shirts and bumper stickers -- it produces each day. Its "Ollie for President" T-shirt is doing well, but one of the best items is a button: "It's a fine mess you've gotten us into this time Ollie."

Out and About

Tammy Faye Bakker apparently saw her "I ran into ..." T-shirt while she was in San Francisco last weekend. She hurried by the smudged picture of herself, and an embarrassed store attendant quickly moved it aside. The North Carolina company that manufactures the shirt says the Bakkers' attorney, Melvin Belli, telephoned to order two ...

One of the country's most famous and respected former Marine colonels, Sen. John Glenn, is to be honored Friday at the Marine Corps Evening Parade at the Marine Barracks here for his 23 years of service to the Corps. He will be the only member of Congress the Corps will honor this year. The two-hour performance of music and precision marching in honor of Glenn coincides this week with the 30th anniversary of Glenn's becoming the first aviator to cross the country faster than the speed of sound ...

Prince Andrew and Fergie received a squealing welcome from more than 7,000 when they arrived yesterday in Toronto. Fergie, wearing a bright red suit and a red maple leaf in her hair, worked the crowd. Andy, who attended school in Canada when he was a teen-ager, expressed a special fondness for the Commonwealth country. And he reportedly is going to take his wife to a cabin where he used to take some of his Canadian girlfriends ...

It was a tough fight, but after all M&M's is a venerable American candy and not to be copied by Japanese imitators. Sen. Frank Lautenberg has won his battle with the Japanese candy M&M look-alikes called Lotte's, which had also been copying the M&M packaging and the famous slogan "Melts in your mouth, not in your hand." Speaking on the Senate floor yesterday, Lautenberg, who is from New Jersey where M&M's are made, said the Japanese company has agreed to stop its copycat marketing. "This is not only a victory for the American chocolate lovers everywhere, it's a victory for the right of American companies to have their advertising and packaging protected in the world marketplace." And people thought the only thing happening on Capitol Hill was the Iran-contra hearings ...