Television and radio networks are unhappy so far with pool arrangements made by the Pentagon for coverage from the scene of U.S. Navy activity in the tense Persian Gulf ...

Under the Pentagon's national press pool arrangements, developed after the Grenada invasion, the networks dispatched a pool to the Persian Gulf last weekend consisting of an ABC radio reporter and a crew and correspondent from Cable News Network, as the Navy prepared to inaugurate an expanded presence in the Strait of Hormuz ...

But as of late yesterday, there hadn't been a peep or a picture yet out of the network pool, which has been aboard the destroyer USS Kidd since probably Sunday (a Pentagon source said yesterday that they may not have arrived aboard until Monday) ...

George Watson, ABC News bureau chief here, said yesterday, "Three days have elapsed and we haven't heard one word or seen a foot of tape from the pool, leading us to believe the Pentagon is failing to provide us with means to get tapes off the Kidd" ...

Watson said he understood that a couple of efforts to offload tapes to small boats have failed and that no helicopter has been used to deliver the tapes to locations on the Gulf -- such as Bahrain, Kuwait and Dubai -- where the radio and TV material could be transmitted to the United States via satellite ...

Print reporters have been able to use telex machines available on the Kidd, which transmit direct to the Pentagon on internal circuits for further distribution to newspapers and wire services ...

Watson said, "The Pentagon says it's making an effort and that's all we get out of them" ...

A Pentagon source told a reporter late yesterday, "It's simply a logistical problem, getting it from the vessel to other hands," intimating that the Kidd's current assignment didn't lend itself to an easy transfer of video or radio tapes to small boats under the circumstances ...

Similarly, the use of a helicopter, particularly after darkness falls, "involves too many unacceptable risks at this time," the source said. "We'd like to get the stuff back to shore, but up to this point, it's been too risky" ...

Also in the News WETA yesterday announced that Phil Kopper has been named editor of its new locally produced magazine, which will replace the national Dial magazine starting in October ...

The new publication, which will go to the 145,000 members of WETA, will be called DIAL/WETA ...

Kopper, the author of six books, most recently has been editor of Museum and Arts Washington ...

WETA president Ward Chamberlin said yesterday that the new magazine will consist of at least five major features relating to public TV and radio programs, a travel column and the crossword puzzle column, as well as complete listings of radio and TV programs on the public stations ...

The magazine will be produced and printed by RJR Associates Inc. of Philadelphia, which will also handle advertising sales for the magazine ...

Dial was begun in 1980 and eventually was published in 12 local editions for station members in 15 cities but has been a steady money loser ...

When the publishers of Dial announced early this year they would have to raise its yearly $3 charge per member subscription to $4 (which included monthly mailing costs) -- boosting WETA's annual contribution from $435,000 to $580,000 -- the station, along with other major contributors, decided to drop out ...

In May, WETA announced it was planning to print its own magazine. As one of the original bankrollers for the Dial project, WETA has rights to use the title. The national magazine will fold after the September edition ...

WNET in New York, coincidentally, this week announced it will begin a 24-hour program schedule starting in mid-September, using funds saved from its contribution to Dial to help underwrite the around-the-clock programming ...

(Channel 26 has no plans for 24-hour broadcasting right now -- it costs too much) ...

Bill Wagner, executive producer for the 11 p.m. news at Channel 9, resigned yesterday. He has been with the station for three years. No replacement had been named late yesterday ...

Hanna-Barbera Productions has acquired animation rights for comedian Eddie Murphy, currently starring in "Beverly Hills Cop II" ...

They'll be developing animated specials and even a primetime series, but it's so early in the planning that the Taft Entertainment Co. subsidiary hasn't decided whether to aim for a network or try syndication or just what Murphy characters would work best in animation ...

Four locally based broadcasting organizations are among 30 groups from around the nation that will be honored at the White House this morning as part of the President's Private Sector Initiative awards program ...

The awards are given to businesses for exemplary voluntary programs in local communities ...

Among the winners: Channel 32, the Howard University public TV station, which will be honored for developing the Washington Metropolitan Area Committee on School Attendance ...

Channel 4, for that station's "Beautiful Babies Right From the Start" campaign against infant mortality ...

Also to be honored are American Women in Radio & Television for their "Soaring Spirits Programs," which provide quality TV programs for hospitalized children; and the National Association of Broadcasters, for its broadcast industry productivity council, which teams local broadcasters with businesses, civic groups, educators and elected officials to address the most pressing problems in the area they serve ...

Fox Broadcasting's new Saturday lineup averaged a 4.0 rating and a 9 percent audience share in national Nielsen ratings between 8 and 10 p.m. ...

The Fox Sunday lineup dropped to a 2.9/6 between 7 and 10 p.m. ...

Each rating point represents 874,000 TV homes ...

And Finally A tip of the ole rabbit ears, tastefully festooned in blue, to Steve and Kathy Doocy, proud parents of 7 pound, 5 1/2 ounce Peter James, who arrived at a Washington-area hospital at 9:04 p.m. Tuesday ...

Peter James is the couple's first child. Steve is the feature reporter for Channel 4's "Live at Five" newscast ...