NBC, which dominates prime time on network TV, dominated the annual Emmy nominations announced yesterday in Los Angeles.

NBC's "L.A. Law" series captured 20 nominations, followed by NBC's "Golden Girls" and ABC's "Moonlighting" with 14 each.

In all, members of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences gave NBC 140 nominations. ABC and CBS tied with 75, the Public Broadcasting Service received 25, the fledgling Fox Broadcasting network had five and syndicated shows received seven.

Fox recently outbid the three big networks for the rights to broadcast the prime-time Emmys over the next three years. This year's will air Sunday, Sept. 20.

"L.A. Law's" nominations included those for best drama series, best lead actors for Corbin Bernsen, Susan Dey and Jill Eikenberry, and best guest performer for Jeanne Cooper. It also received two direction nominations and two for writing, include one for creators Steven Bochco and Terry Louise Fisher ...

NBC's "St. Elsewhere" won 11 nominations, its "Cheers" won 10, and two NBC miniseries, "Nutcracker: Money, Madness and Murder" and "The Two Mrs. Grenvilles," got nine and eight, respectively ...

CBS' "Cagney & Lacey" won seven nominations, including best drama series ...

ABC's long-winded $42 million fiasco, "Amerika," won only three nominations, which figures out to about $14 million per ...

Nominations in some of the major categories included:

Best Comedy Series: "Cheers," "The Cosby Show," "Family Ties," "The Golden Girls" and "Night Court."

Best Drama Series: "Cagney and Lacey," "L.A. Law," "Moonlighting," "Murder, She Wrote" and "St. Elsewhere."

Best Miniseries: "Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna," "Nutcracker: Money, Madness and Murder," "The Two Mrs. Grenvilles" and "A Year in the Life," all on NBC, and ABC's "Out on a Limb."

Best Variety, Music or Comedy Program: Fox's "The Tracey Ullman Show," NBC's "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson" and "Late Night With David Letterman," CBS's "1987 Tony Awards" and David Wolper's "Liberty Weekend: Closing Ceremonies," ABC.

Best Leading Actor in a Comedy Series: Harry Anderson, "Night Court"; Ted Danson, "Cheers"; Michael J. Fox, "Family Ties"; Bob Newhart, "Newhart"; and Bronson Pinchot, "Perfect Strangers."

Best Leading Actress in a Comedy Series: Bea Arthur, "The Golden Girls"; Blair Brown, "The Days and Nights of Molly Dodd"; Jane Curtin, "Kate and Allie"; Rue McClanahan, "The Golden Girls"; and Betty White, "The Golden Girls."

Best Leading Actor in a Drama Series: Corbin Bernsen, "L.A. Law"; William Daniels, "St. Elsewhere"; Ed Flanders, "St. Elsewhere"; Bruce Willis, "Moonlighting"; and Edward Woodward, "The Equalizer."

Best Leading Actress in a Drama Series: Tyne Daly (a three-time winner), "Cagney and Lacey"; Susan Dey, "L.A. Law"; Jill Eikenberry, "L.A. Law"; Sharon Gless, "Cagney and Lacey"; and Angela Lansbury, "Murder, She Wrote."

Best Leading Actor in a Miniseries or Special Feature: Alan Arkin, "Escape from Sobibor"; James Garner, "Promise"; Louis Gossett Jr., "A Gathering of Old Men"; Randy Quaid, "LBJ: The Early Years"; and James Woods, "Promise."

Best Leading Actress in a Miniseries or Special Feature: Ellen Burstyn, "Pack of Lies"; Ann-Margret, "The Two Mrs. Grenvilles"; Lee Remick, "Nutcracker: Money, Madness and Murder"; Gena Rowlands, "The Betty Ford Story"; and Alfre Woodard, "Unnatural Causes."

Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series: Woody Harrelson, "Cheers," NBC; John Larroquette, "Night Court," NBC; Tom Poston, "Newhart," CBS; Peter Scolari, "Newhart"; George Wendt, "Cheers."

Supporting Actor in a Drama Series: Ed Begley Jr., "St. Elsewhere," NBC; John Hillerman, "Magnum, P.I.," CBS; John Karlen, "Cagney and Lacey"; Jimmy Smits, "L.A. Law"; Michael Tucker, "L.A. Law."

Supporting Actor in a Miniseries or Special: Dabney Coleman, "Sworn to Silence," ABC; Stephen Collins, "The Two Mrs. Grenvilles"; John Glover, "Nutcracker: Money, Madness and Murder"; Laurence Olivier, "Lost Empires," PBS; Eli Wallach, "Something in Common," CBS.

Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series: Justine Bateman, "Family Ties," NBC; Julia Duffy, "Newhart"; Estelle Getty, "The Golden Girls," NBC; Jackee Harry, "227," NBC; Rhea Perlman, "Cheers."

Supporting Actress in a Drama Series: Bonnie Bartlett, "St. Elsewhere"; Allyce Beasley, "Moonlighting," ABC; Christina Pickles, "St. Elsewhere"; Susan Ruttan, "L.A. Law"; Betty Thomas, "Hill Street Blues," NBC.

Supporting Actress in a Miniseries or Special: Claudette Colbert, "The Two Mrs. Grenvilles"; Olivia de Havilland, "Anastasia: The Mystery of Anna," NBC; Christine Lahti, "Amerika," (miniseries) ABC; Piper Laurie, "Promise," CBS; Elizabeth Wilson, "Nutcracker: Money, Madness and Murder."

Individual Performance in a Variety or Music Program: Billy Crystal, "The 29th Annual Grammy Awards," CBS; Julie Kavner, "The Tracey Ullman Show," FBC; Angela Lansbury, "The 1987 Tony Awards"; Jon Lovitz, "Saturday Night Live," NBC; Robin Williams, "Carol, Carl, Whoopi & Robin," ABC.

Guest Performer in a Comedy Series: Art Carney, "The Cavanaughs," CBS; John Cleese, "Cheers"; Herb Edelman, "The Golden Girls"; Lois Nettleton, "The Golden Girls"; Nancy Walker, "The Golden Girls."

Also in the News Jim Lampley, recently dropped by ABC Sports, may sign today to be top weeknight sportscaster for KCBS, the CBS-owned station in Los Angeles ...

If he signs, CBS Sports will team him as play-by-play announcer with Ken Stabler on its NFL broadcasting team roster this fall ...

In a rare display of symmetry in a most unsymmetrical business, Lampley would replace Jim Hill at KCBS. Hill last week took a similar job at ABC-owned KABC in L.A. while signing with ABC Sports for its college football scoreboard show and the Winter Olympics ...

Bob Keeshan, who was "Captain Kangaroo" on CBS for nearly 30 years, is recuperating from triple-bypass surgery at a Houston hospital. According to his surgeon, the 60-year-old actor and producer is doing well, and his spokeswoman said yesterday that he is expected to return to his Long Island, N.Y., home this weekend ...

Fox Broadcasting's "The Late Show" recorded only a 1.4 national Nielsen rating during the week ending July 24, its worst performance since the week ending July 10 ...

WBBM, the CBS-owned station in Chicago, will move "CBS Evening News With Dan Rather" to 6 p.m., where it will no longer compete at 5:30 with "ABC World News Tonight with Peter Jennings" on ABC-owned WLS and "NBC Nightly News with Tom Brokaw" on NBC-owned WMAQ ...

In Chicago, ABC's Jennings beats network rivals by almost two-to-one, with NBC and CBS battling for a distant second. The failure of CBS' "Evening News" to get big numbers in the third-largest market in the country is blamed -- at CBS News, anyway -- in part for Rather's national ratings problems ("Evening News" isn't exactly knocking them out in the other three major markets where CBS owns a station, either) ...

WCBS in New York tried to move Rather to 6:30 to compete with Jennings on WABC recently but the network prevailed ...

The Chicago move has its own perils. Floyd Kalber, on WLS, owns the 6 p.m. local news in that market, aided by the prospect of "Wheel of Fortune" at 6:30 ...

WBBM vice president Johnathan Rogers received approval from both CBS News president Howard Stringer and Rather for the move. Stringer had balked at the WCBS move ...

Speaking of CBS News, they're bracing themselves in New York for another round of highly speculative stories about the grim future of the division since the publication in the L.A. Times of rumors that (1) CBS Inc. president Laurence Tisch wants to cut another $55 million from the news budget and (2) wants to move the whole shebang to Washington ...

CBS Inc. vice president George Schweitzer and CBS News president Howard Stringer have already issued the strongest denials of both rumors. But since Tisch earlier this year once termed "ludicrous" a report he wanted to cut $50 million from a then-$300 million annual budget and shortly thereafter okayed a $30 million cut that cost 230 jobs, the skeptics are circling again ...

PBS announced yesterday that to accommodate Sen. Robert Dole's schedule, it is moving the Republican presidential candidate debate from Sept. 2 to Oct. 28 ...

A similar debate among seven Democratic candidates was aired July 1 from Houston on PBS. Both programs are under the aegis of William F. Buckley Jr.'s "Firing Line" ...

With the date change, PBS is now looking for another site, with Los Angeles as a possibility ...

PBS officials are hopeful that Vice President George Bush may now join the GOP debaters, if he has declared his candidacy by the later date. Earlier, he declined to participate before declaring ...

So far, Buckley has received six confirmed acceptances, from Dole, Pete duPont, Alexander Haig, Jack Kemp, Paul Laxalt and Pat Robertson ...