President Harry S Truman left behind a hefty, salty manuscript that promises to become a provocative best seller when it is published next year. A spokesman at Little, Brown said the late president's daughter Margaret Truman Daniel is at work putting the manuscript into shape. Although the book has not yet been delivered to the publishers, early reports indicate it is Trumanesque in its unflinching, harsh portrayals of other presidents and politicians.

The spokesman said that in the years after he left the White House, Truman created a rambling manuscript of some 2,000 pages from his reminiscences. Aware of the volatility of the work, Truman aed that it not be published until both he and his wife Bess were dead.

Some Enchanted Evening? It's probably happened to most men at one time or another. That woman across the room looks like someone who meant something romantic and important a long time ago. That's what happened to 1985 Indianapolis 500 winner Danny Sullivan Tuesday night at Dominique's where he was dining on rattlesnake, buffalo sausage and alligator. Whatever happened to a good steak?

He stopped eating, and with a look of shock on his face, stared at a dark-haired woman seated with an elderly couple at a table across the room. "I know her," he said. "I lived with her for five years in Italy. It's her. I know it's her," he told a friend at the table. He aed the waiter if the woman was drinking Campari and soda. She was. That cinched it. That was "her favorite drink." Sullivan got up and went across the room. It wasn't her. Back at his own table, he sat silently for a long time staring off into the distance.

Out and About Calif. Rep. Tom Lantos, cochairman of the Congressional Human Rights Caucus, led a brief ceremony Tuesday on the Capitol steps in memory of World War II Swedish diplomat Raoul Wallenberg. Wallenberg was credited with rescuing tens of thousands of Jews from Nazi death camps by giving them Swedish passports and citizenship papers. He disappeared at the close of World War II, and many believe he remains imprisoned in the Soviet Union. At the ceremony, Lantos, who said he hoped Wallenberg was still alive, led in singing "Happy Birthday" on what would be the diplomat's 75th birthday ...

Successful writer and former policeman Joseph Wambaugh testified this week on behalf of "Fatal Vision" author Joe McGinniss, saying authors should lie to the subjects of their books if that will keep them talking. McGinniss is fighting a $15 million breach of contract suit over his book brought by Jeffrey MacDonald, the former Green Beret doctor who was convicted of killing his wife and two daughters. MacDonald contends McGinniss promised to write a favorable book. Wambaugh, the author of the bestselling nonfiction books "The Onion Field" and "Lines and Shadows," said he turned down an invitation to write a book about the case. He testified also that he would tell "untruths" to get a subject to talk, and that if he were required by law to disclose to a book subject his views on the subject's guilt, "I would cease writing nonfiction entirely" ...

After winning the Battle of the Prenuptial Agreement with Peter Holm, actress Joan Collins threw a celebration bash last weekend at her Beverly Hills home for a group of friends that included Morgan Fairchild, Angie Dickinson, Jacqueline Bisset, Alexander Godunov, Tina Sinatra, Swifty Lazar, Aaron and Candy Spelling and George Hamilton ...

It's amazing what someone will buy. Isaac Tigrett, who owns five Hard Rock Cafes, has paid $37,000 at an auction in London for a 19-year-old, two-hour-long taped interview with Beatle John Lennon. The tape was made in 1968 by two Beatles fans, and patrons of Tigrett's cafe's will now get to listen to Lennon's answers to such questions as "How many cats do you have?" and one philosophical mind-twister, "Do you think humanity is mold on the surface of an orange?" That ought to add to someone's dining pleasure at the trendy restaurants ...