It is not likely after all that the ashes of acerbic wit Dorothy Parker will eventually rest behind the bar at that New York literary landmark, the Algonquin Hotel. The hotel's new general manager, Andrew Noble, respects the memory of Parker and the other literary and show biz celebrities who gathered at the hotel's famous Round Table, but he doesn't believe the hotel bar is a fitting resting place for anyone's ashes, even those of the memorable, sardonic writer.

"It's a colorful idea," Noble said yesterday, "but we don't want them here." He did point out that the hotel will host a meeting next month to determine just what will be done with Parker's ashes all these years after her death in 1967. The ashes are in her lawyer's Manhattan office. As for the famous Round Table of Parker, whose members included George S. Kaufman, James Thurber, Edna Ferber, Harpo Marx and Ring Lardner, to name a few, there will be no attempt to revive it. That idea comes up from time to time, but as Noble wisely explains, the table was a spontaneous creation of the era. "Reviving it wouldn't work; it would be artificial." Gail Sheehy on Donna Rice Author Gail Sheehy has written a profile of Gary Hart's friend and sometime model Donna Rice in the latest issue of Vanity Fair that emphasizes Rice's party girl image. And of the former presidential hopeful and his reputation for womanizing, Sheehy writes that in addition to Hart's relationship with Rice, he spent time in Hollywood with Warren Beatty, sitting by the pool, "which was often populated with topless starlets."

And as for Rice, who Sheehy says lived for two years with convicted drug trafficker James Bradley Parks, she is described as "a character with no center, no concrete goal, the kind known to 'knockabout guys' as an 'action girl,' just drifting from party to party in a perpetual state of expectation that the next introduction will lead to the next connection, which she can then parlay into a meeting with the next rich or famous man." Out and About Record company executives and most Bruce Springsteen fans weren't expecting it this year, but to their surprise the "Boss" is coming out with a new album in early autumn. Titled "Tunnel of Love," it will be the first Springsteen studio album since "Born in the U.S.A." in 1985. A spokesman for Springsteen who has heard some of the new album said it is impossible to describe, is unlike any of his previous albums, and is not what people might expect. But he added, "One thing it does not have is a country flavor." The spokesman said that "this album is very personal and intimate, but it has full band arrangements throughout the record." The E Street Band will be involved in some parts of the album, but steel guitarist Jay Dee Maness, who was listed in some reports as being included, will not be on the album ...

This being the time to remember Elvis Presley, "West 57th" has gone out to find celebrity fans. One interviewed for the show, which airs tomorrow, was Rep. Pat Schroeder, who remembers as a young girl when the Tennessee boy and his music became famous: "This was just a real rebellious, raucous, uncultured, uncouth new form of music that came forward by someone who our parents also thought was uncultured and uncouth and therefore it was positively charming" ...

The networks nervously didn't show much interest in it, but WETA has decided to sponsor the much-talked-about show "AIDS, Changing the Rules," which will be seen over the PBS network and is narrated by first family media son Ron Reagan. This is the show that talks to heterosexuals about AIDS and has some graphic scenes, including one in which a condom is placed on a banana. The half-hour special will air Nov. 6 ...

In the blue government listings pages of the C&P telephone directory, the National Endowment for the Humanities is listed as the National Endowment for the Humanists. Would that be secular or non? And does Sen. Jesse Helms know about this? ...