Anjelica Huston told mourners at a memorial service honoring her father, John Huston, one of Hollywood's most enduring legends, that he didn't really die in his sleep last month as originally reported. The famed director of such classics as "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre," "The Maltese Falcon" and "The African Queen" was with his longtime companion Marcella Hernandez "and pretty much knew not where he was going, but that he was going," Huston told the 500 people at Hollywood's Directors Guild Theater for the Saturday gathering. She said the 81-year-old Huston held Hernandez's hand and talked of many things.

Actress Lauren Bacall, who starred with her husband Humphrey Bogart in Huston's "Key Largo," told stories of the location filming for "The African Queen." Jack Nicholson wept and then told Huston's favorite, but unprintable, joke. And Robert Mitchum, who has replaced Huston as an actor in the unfinished film "Mr. North," talked affectionately of the last poker game they played at the film's New England shooting location. "We both lost $300, and that is what sent him to the hospital," Mitchum cracked. The tribute ended with the playing of "September Song," the poignant hit from the 1940s sung by Huston's father, Walter Huston, whom John directed to an acting Oscar in "The Treasure of the Sierra Madre."

Out and About

There are certain jobs that people don't list on their re'sume's: Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan said his first job as a 14-year-old growing up on Manhattan's Upper West Side was shining shoes in Times Square for 50 cents an hour. Moynihan and a group of other successful New Yorkers talked about their first jobs in a recent issue of Avenue, the super-slick, ad-choked magazine whose list price is $5 a copy but really goes free to the select few who live on high-rent avenues like Manhattan's Fifth or Park and places like that. U.S. News & World Report Publisher Mortimer Zuckerman graduated from Harvard Law School in 1962 and promptly went into real estate, where he made his millions. And why not practice law, Washington's career of choice? "I decided law was the exact opposite of sex: even when it was good it was lousy," Zuckerman observes ...

They'll probably have someone standing close by with a fire extinguisher. The Pepsi-Cola Co. has announced that singer Michael Jackson, who is back at work again after some time off buying exotic animals and things, will be featured in a new series of Pepsi television commercials. Done both in Spanish and English, the commercials are described as episodic and in four parts, with Jackson involved in "extraordinary and exciting situations, ending in a blockbuster conclusion." So says the Pepsi spokesman. The commercials' story line was not revealed, nor was the staggering amount of money Jackson will undoubtedly receive. The last time Jackson did a Pepsi commercial his hair caught on fire and he spent some time in the hospital recovering. This time, you can bet, everyone will be careful ...

Hospital Report: Billy Carter's doctors in Atlanta's Emory University Hospital said the former president's brother is in stable condition after the lengthy surgery during which it was discovered he has inoperable pancreatic cancer. Dr. Martin York, a tumor specialist, said the prognosis for the 50-year-old Carter is poor. He said some people have lived three years after such a diagnosis, "but usually it's much shorter than that." Tragically, Carter's sister, evangelist Ruth Carter Stapleton, died of pancreatic cancer in 1983 when she was 54 ...

Gary Hart's ride on the good ship Monkey Business has obviously been good for business. Since the former presidential candidate took his ill-fated cruise with Donna Rice, that blond Miami sometime model, Monkey Business' owners have had a good summer rental season, Travel magazine is reporting. The boat has been chartered by, among others, singers Madonna and Lionel Richie and comedian Jerry Lewis ...