No one asked Elizabeth Taylor if another wedding was in her future, but the much-married actress told a congressional committee yesterday she would have herself tested for exposure to the AIDS virus before embarking on an "intimate relationship" and would insist her partner also be tested.

Taylor was testifying before the House subcommittee on health and the environment in her capacity as chairman of the American Foundation for AIDS Research, a cause she adopted after her longtime friend Rock Hudson died of the disease. To combat the disease, she said, "I'll do anything ... I'll ring doorbells," obviously aware that almost no one could turn down Elizabeth Taylor. When asked if that included the doorbell at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue, she answered, "I know that place."

Stassen's Well-Worn Hat Harold Stassen is off and running again on his eighth bid for the Oval Office. The 80-year-old was the boy wonder of Republican politics back in 1938 when he was elected governor of Minnesota at age 31. He has not held elective office since being reelected governor in 1940 and 1942. In 1948 he was a major contender for the Republican presidential nomination, losing it to Thomas E. Dewey. He also mounted campaigns in 1952, 1964, 1968, 1976, 1980 and 1984.

Stassen said Monday that he made his decision to run the previous night. His first campaign appearance will be at the Independent-Republican convention in St. Cloud, Minn., this weekend, and his first out-of-state trip (to Iowa) will come next week. He says he knows he can't win, but feels he can have an impact on the final choices at the Republican National Convention. He entered the race, he added, because the other candidates are not discussing a number of important issues including child care and the plight of the family farmer.

Out and About Tony winner Henderson Forsythe will have one of the lead roles in Washington author Larry L. King's new play, "The Night Hank Williams Died," when it is performed at New Playwrights' Theatre in February. Forsythe won his Tony as Sheriff Ed Earl Dodd in King's smash musical, "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas." Soap opera fans will remember Forsythe as Dr. David Stewart, a role he played for more than 20 years on "As the World Turns" ...

As with New Jersey after he said he'd never go back there, Frank Sinatra has agreed to return to Australia, 13 years after he cut short a tour there in a fury. He ended that visit following repeated clashes with journalists and a news conference at which he called female reporters a "bunch of hookers." The 71-year-old singer's five-day visit will launch a tourist resort on the so-called Gold Coast near Brisbane, and he'll probably be rewarded with enough cash to soothe his injured feelings from the past ...

Sen. Edward Kennedy, who takes part in a program of syndicated radio mini-debates with Senate Minority Leader Robert Dole, will "Face-Off" instead tomorrow with the other Dole, Transportation Secretary Elizabeth Dole, who is resigning her position to help her husband campaign for the Republican presidential nomination. She plans to answer Kennedy's quip that "the wrong Dole resigned" ...