Few people claim to know or understand the sometimes charming, sometimes intimidating Jack Kent Cooke. Since he moved to the Washington area in 1979, few things, even the Redskins' 1983 Super Bowl victory, have created more interest than his marriage more than two months ago to 31-year-old Suzanne Elizabeth Martin. The first look the public is going to get of Martin, who is expecting a child early next year, will be in a three-part series beginning today on WRC's "News 4" at 6 p.m. that covers a wide-ranging series of topics, including her past drug problems.

In talking about the Redskins, Cooke's current claim to fame, reporter Barbara Harrison asks Martin if her 74-year-old husband gets upset when any of his football players are injured during a game, as in the season opener when star quarterback Jay Schroeder was hurt. "Certainly, yes he does, as if one of our racehorses was hurt," Martin quickly responded.

Cooke, who is also well known for his sensitivity to criticism, reportedly was enraged by an article by senior writer Robert Pack in the recent Washingtonian. Pack, who has written previous articles about Cooke, was called to the Redskins owner's office Friday at Redskin Park, where he discovered that Cooke, his son John Cooke, Coach Joe Gibbs and General Manager Bobby Beathard were in attendance. They were there, Pack confirmed yesterday, to assure Cooke that they had nothing to do with the article and to deny what was written. Pack said yesterday that outside Cooke's office window, the ersatz Redskins were practicing -- without Gibbs on the sidelines. And in a final comment, Cooke told Pack he was forbidden from ever returning to Redskin Park.

Out and About

Retired librarian of Congress Daniel J. Boorstin has become a contributing editor for U.S. News & World Report. The Pulitzer Prize-winning historian will maintain his principal Washington office at U.S. News, will participate in editorial planning and is scheduled to write "from time to time." Boorstin, who was the 12th librarian of Congress, is also joining Doubleday as an editor at large and is working on a book, "The Creators" ...

David Adler, the founder of Dossier, had been looking for something to publish since the magazine was sold in 1985. Today he begins publication of the Washington Herald, a fortnightly, free tabloid aimed at the downtown set and the city's business powers and opinion makers. Adler evolved the new tabloid, filled with gossipy chatter, from an earlier publication called Immediate Release News Service, where it was possible to buy space to publish unedited news releases. The new publication will still offer that service but Adler plans to develop the paper into a tabloid filled with features and gossip ...

Singer Frank Sinatra was not at all happy about Washington writer Kitty Kelley's book "His Way: The Unauthorized Biography of Frank Sinatra," but it's Sinatra's former valet who has filed suit. George Jacobs filed a $2 million libel suit against Kelley and her publisher, Bantam Books Inc., in Los Angeles Superior Court last week. In the book, Jacobs, who was Sinatra's valet from 1953 to 1969, is quoted as saying the singer once tore up actor Peter Lawford's clothes, that he accused Jacobs of sleeping with actress Mia Farrow when she was married to Sinatra, and that Sinatra once tried to commit suicide. Jacobs, who denies being interviewed by Kelley or ever relating the events, says the writer makes him look like a disloyal employe and claims he has stopped getting job offers from those who have read the book ...