The National Association of Broadcast Employees and Technicians (NABET) ended its 17-week strike against NBC Saturday ...

There is a possibility that a majority of the 2,800 cameramen, writers, editors and other technicians affected by the walkout -- including 300 at the NBC bureau here -- could return to work by Monday, Nov. 2 ...

McLain Ramsey, a spokesman for the network, said yesterday that NBC is "hopeful for a Nov. 2 start, but there are complicated schedules to be worked out with the union, and we must stress the word 'hopeful' at this time" ...

Saturday, two holdout units of NABET, representing a total of 52 members in Chicago and Burbank, Calif., voted to accept NBC's final offer ...

Couriers in Chicago and air-conditioning and building maintenance workers in California had first rejected the pact a week ago and, under union bylaws, prevented final settlement, although a majority of union members around the country had voted to return to work ...

Since the walkout began June 29, management personnel have worked NABET jobs throughout the system. Although many have been exhausted by the long hours, they've been drawing large paychecks and, as the weeks went by, gained considerable proficiency at their strike jobs ...

Not surprisingly, as the strike went on, NBC management took another look at its total work force and, with layoffs already in the works because of the sale of its radio network, has now decided that 200 NABET jobs can be eliminated by the end of the year, with another 300 ticketed for elimination in 1988 ...

Thus, as the strikers return to work -- having already lost one-third of their annual salaries, confronting layoffs, new work rules and nonunion employes who in some instances now feel they've earned consideration for bigger jobs -- NBC management faces an industrial relations task of major proportions all across the board over the next months ...

With the settlement of the costly strike against NBC, attention now shifts to negotiations between CBS and the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW), which represents 1,500 camera operators, video and audio technicians and editors and electricians at that network ...

Union members have continued to work under terms of their original contract, which expired Sept. 30. Friday, the two sides ended three days of federally mediated talks here as the union studies the company's final offer. No further talks are scheduled at this time ...

About 105 employes of the CBS News bureau here are IBEW members ...

Moving Right Along CBS News' upcoming two-hour morning news program, replacing "The Morning Program," goes on the air Nov. 30 ...

But as the days dwindle down to a precious few, CBS News president Howard Stringer still hasn't revealed his choice for Kathleen Sullivan's male co-anchor on the 7-to-9 a.m. show ...

Speculation about Howard's Wish List usually centers on four possibles from inside the CBS News division -- Charles Osgood, Bob Schieffer, Bob Krulwich and Charlie Rose. The last reportedly has been campaigning hard for the job ...

But Stringer some time ago indicated -- and CEO Laurence Tisch has confirmed -- that he is free to go outside the division (as he did when he bid $1 million annually to lure ABC's Sullivan) for her co-anchor. We hear from several sources that at least two of the names still remaining on his Very Short List are, indeed, from Outside ...

And don't be totally surprised if the final choice is someone with both a news and entertainment background, and with a dollop of "excitement" attached to his reputation ...

Arbitron reports that in its 13 big city overnight ratings, President Reagan's Thursday night press conference averaged a 14.9 rating and a 30 percent audience share on NBC, where folks were waiting for Mr. Cosby; a 14.1/23 on ABC, where the World Series was about to begin; and an 8.0/10 on CBS, where audiences eagerly awaited the start of "Mysteries of the Rock-Dwelling Predators" ... for a cumulative rating of 37.0/63 ...

ARB says that Mr. Reagan's last previous meeting with the media, on March 19, averaged a 17.5/26 on NBC, a 10.2/15 on ABC, and a 6.9/12 on CBS in 11 big cities ... or 34.6/53 in toto ...

In Washington Thursday night, the numbers were up because for the first time in memory, Fox-owned Channel 5 joined the local press conference coverage, as WTTG steps up its hard news coverage in the market ...

Locally, Mr. Reagan got a 15.6/26 on NBC affiliate WRC; a 13.6/22 on CBS affiliate WUSA (a tribute to "Wheel of Fortune"); an 8.7/14 on ABC affiliate WJLA; and a 6.5/11 on WTTG ... a cumulative count of 44.4/73 ... up from a cumulative 39.7/55 last March (each local ARB rating point represents 15,751 households) ...

Thursday night, by the way, NBC's "The Cosby Show" went on to a national Nielsen count of 24.2/36; game five of the Series on ABC averaged a 23.4/38; and CBS' "Predators" went home hungry with an 8.2/12 (each rating point represents 886,000 TV homes) ...

After five games between Minnesota and St. Louis this year, ABC had averaged a 22.6/36. After five games last year on NBC, the N.Y. Mets and Boston Red Sox had averaged a 26.2/42 ...

The good news for ABC is that the World Series last night went to its full seven games. Even with 30-second ads selling for $225,000 (with at least 55 such spots available for each game), the $12.5 million in revenue for each game doesn't catch up with outlays for baseball's license fee, ad agency payments and production costs, until game five ...

With Saturday's sixth game, ABC finally made a profit, but last night's finale was pure gravy ...

Last week, Capital Cities/ABC Inc. chairman Thomas Murphy predicted to a New York Post reporter that a seven-game series could even mean a small profit this year overall for the network, which is only now recovering from an industry-wide slump in advertising revenues that ended in late summer ...

Wait, There's More

Channel 9 is producing a one-hour special, "Thurgood Marshall: The Man," which will air Sunday, Dec. 13, at 8 p.m. ...

The program will be repeated at 11:30 the night of Dec. 18 ...

The forthright opinions expressed by the Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court on a recent Carl Rowan special for the station, "Searching for Justice: Three American Stories," generated nationwide interest and spurred interest in a further examination of the life of the first black on the high court ...

Columnist Rowan is conducting further interviews with Justice Marshall for the December special ...

Predictably, National Association of Broadcasters president Edward O. Fritts has denounced legislation that would finance public broadcasting through a federal fee assessed whenever a commercial TV or radio station is sold ...

As part of a deficit reduction package approved Wednesday by the Senate Commerce Committee, the measure calls for a 2 percent tax on the sale of stations as well as satellite and cellular telephone systems. The revenues would go directly to the general treasury for deficit reduction ...

After two years, the measure earmarks the proceeds -- perhaps $300 million a year -- for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, which distributes funds to the public system. Current public broadcasting levels are about $214 million annually, and Congress has already okayed funds for the next two years raising the level to $254 million ...

The bill also codifies the Fairness Doctrine, requiring stations to give opposing views on controversial issues of substantial importance -- another NAB target. It also increases the fee amount for stations deemed in violation of the doctrine ...

"The Committee's recommendation of a transfer fee," Fritts said in a statement, "is a tax pure and simple. It is policy legislation without the proper notice and opportunity for hearings and public comment. It is an attempt to impose by backdoor legislation what the Federal Communications Commission deregulated after full public notice and participation. It is also a budgetary expedient that bears no relation to the cost of the government's processing of transfer of control applications ...

"NAB will fight both this tax and Fairness Doctrine codification every step of the way" ...