Royal Watch: The speculation continues in Britain. Is the marriage of Charles and Diana over? Three of the major London newspapers -- The Sun, the Daily Express and the Daily Mail -- are saying the queen herself is upset and is calling a family conference. Divorce is frowned on in royal circles, especially for the man who is to ascend to the throne. Adding to all the speculation is that after five weeks of separation, Charles and Diana spent less than 24 hours together at their Highgrove estate Saturday.

On Sunday, Diana, her personal security officer and a lady-in-waiting left the estate. It was also reported that she often leaves the country estate on Sundays so she can take her sons William and Harry to school on Monday mornings. As for Charles, he reportedly was staying behind because of a public engagement nearby today. Royal insiders are saying there is nothing to all the press speculation. Time will tell.

Out and About Shari Theismann is back home again in South Bend, Ind., where she first met her ex-husband Joe, then a star quarterback at Notre Dame. Currently she is doing some temporary television work with the possibility of a weekend anchor position in the future. Shari and her three children are living near her mother, and as she said yesterday, "I guess you can go home again." She has been hired to do three celebrity interviews for ABC affiliate WSJV in Elkhart. The first is coming up this week, with singer Kenny Rogers, who is beginning a concert tour in Indianapolis ...

Who was that familiar-looking fellow spooning cream of wheat and wearing a "Today" show baseball cap adorned with the NBC logo? Gene Shalit, that's who. He was seen in the Rothschild Cafeteria line one morning last week demanding to know if the cream of wheat was fresh. In town promoting his book, "Laughing Matters," an anthology of American humor, Shalit was slurping the cereal when a busboy approached to ask if he had ever appeared on television in Lancaster, Pa. "I've never been there," Shalit said and returned to his newspaper. Not to be brushed aside, the busboy persisted. "Haven't I seen you on the 'Today' show?" Shalit looked up again and pointed to his cap and said, "That's just something I wear." The busboy walked away with a puzzled look ...

Mitch Snyder has a way of getting folks to come out and help his street people. His organization, the Community for Creative Non-Violence, will again be feeding Thanksgiving dinners to the homeless this year, and helping him will be a group of some of the most famous political cartoonists in the country. Already signed up to work the serving line are Pat Oliphant, Paul Conrad, Tony Auth and Jules Feiffer. Oliphant has written a "Dear Colleague" letter to cartoonists across the country suggesting that Thanksgiving "would be an ideal time to draw attention to the mean-spirited legacy of the Reagan years, to the fact that the ranks of the disadvantaged are still swelling" ...

The November Washingtonian, with 268 ad pages and 454 total pages, is the biggest issue in the magazine's 22-year history. To celebrate the issue -- titled "The Making of Washington," a salute to the area's major builders and developers -- Washingtonian owners Phil and Ellie Merrill decided to throw a party. And with such well-known developers as Oliver Carr, Giuseppe Cecchi, Theodore Lerner and Clarence Kettler coming, the question of where to hold last night's reception became touchy. Many of the developers offered their own buildings. That wouldn't do, so they compromised on the National Building Museum at the Pension Building ...