If General Secretary Gorbachev grants a one-on-one interview to an American network during his brief visit here next month, apparently it won't be with CBS News ...

CBS, like ABC and NBC, has had a request in for such a journalistic coup since long before a firm date was ever set for the summit here, which starts Dec. 7 ...

Yesterday, Wyatt Andrews, the CBS Moscow bureau chief, was informed by a Soviet official that there would be no CBS interview because of a network documentary on the Soviet war with Afghanistan rebels that aired July 29 and because of questions Dan Rather asked during an October 1985 press conference held by the Soviet leader in Paris ...

At that time, through a translator, Rather asked: "Why not let everyone of Jewish heritage who wants to emigrate from the Soviet Union do so, and secondly, sir, would you tell us how many political prisoners there are in the Soviet Union?" ...

Gorbachev's response at the time: "I answered both questions in my interview with French TV and I have nothing to add" ...

CBS News president Howard Stringer telexed a letter to Mr. Gorbachev yesterday saying that "CBS News is shocked and disappointed that we have been denied a one-on-one interview with you prior to or duing your upcoming visit" ...

Stringer called "unsettling" the "apparent cause" of the rejection, the Afghanistan coverage and the "human rights question." "We have worked diligently," Stringer wrote, "to cover these major news stories in a balanced way" ...

"... We have tried to be fair, serious and open-minded, but at the same time aggressive and tough in our reporting. And, we have worked very hard to rise above the 'comfortable stereotypes' about your people, your country and your politics, about which you spoke in the July 14 address before the leaders of the Mass Media and Creative Unions in Moscow" ...

He reminded the Soviet leader of the network's news special "The Soviet Union: Seven Days in May," which Stringer said "was in the best spirt of candor, openness and fairness -- in other words, in the best spirit of glasnost" ...

In a revealing paragraph, Stringer concluded that "we firmly believe that declining an interview with CBS News is not in the best interests of either the United States or the Soviet Union. We remain hopeful that our long-standing request will be reconsidered" ...

In a statement issued late yesterday, Rather said: "The Russians repeatedly made it clear that to have any chance for a Gorbachev interview, we had to cease our aggressive coverage of the war in Afghanistan and stop asking tough questions about Soviet anti-Semitism. We refused. Neither our conscience nor sense of honor would allow us to do otherwise" ...

Meanwhile, spokesmen for both NBC News and ABC News said late yesterday that their networks have had similar requests for interviews with Mr. Gorbachev in "for some time" and both said the networks have yet to receive a response, one way or the other ...

In Other News

NBC executives yesterday concluded a four-day love feast in the Hawaiian islands with the governors board of its affiliates -- very few of whom have much to complain about these days to the number one primetime network ...

One problem that has worried local NBC stations is the loss of potential revenues during the Summer Olympics in Seoul -- which because of the time difference will be seen mostly in prime time -- from pre-emption of their evening local newscasts ...

Pierson G. Mapes, president of the NBC Television Network, said yesterday that as a result the network had agreed to provide three primetime "news windows" for local stations during the 17-day Games that start in mid-September ...

They include a four-minute break sometime between 8 and 9 p.m., a three- to five-minute break sometime around 11 p.m. and a half hour for local news at midnight ...

Mapes said ABC's experience with the 1984 Olympics indicated that with a Games lead-in, late night local news shows averaged a 22 percent increase in audience over regular late newscasts at 11 p.m. ...

Mapes also disclosed that NBC's ambitious plan to tackle CBS' "60 Minutes" on Sunday nights with a show, tentatively titled "90 Minutes," featuring input from the entertainment, news and sports divisions of the network, will get a preview on the network sometime in April ...

The program, which would begin at 6:30 p.m. on Sundays -- but could be shortened because of NFL overruns so that the rest of the primetime schedule could start promptly at 8 p.m. that night -- is not expected to become a fixture on the primetime schedule until January 1989, after the NFL regular season has been completed ...

A Times Mirror survey conducted by the Gallup Organization released yesterday shows "a significant decline" in the "very favorable" ratings for network anchormen over the past two years ...

CBS News' Dan Rather showed the sharpest drop, from a 40 percent "very favorable" rating in June 1985 to 24 percent when the most recent poll was conducted, between Oct. 25 and Nov. 4, 1987 ...

ABC's Peter Jennings' "very favorable" ratings have declined from 33 to 25 percent, while NBC's Tom Brokaw slipped from 29 to 23 percent over the same two-year period ...

The nationwide telephone poll of 1,501 persons, age 18 and over, included a section that broke reponses down according to the 11 groups of American voters detailed in a recent Times Mirror study, "The People, the Press & Politics" ...

The 11 groups are divided into two GOP clusters (dubbed Enterprisers and Moralists), two GOP-leaning independent groups (Upbeats and Disaffecteds), one group of nonvoters (Bystanders), two Democratic-leaning groups (Followers and Seculars) and four core Democratic groups -- '60s Democrats, New Dealers, Partisan Poor and Passive Poor ...

The poll concluded that "in general, Republican-oriented groups have a less favorable view of network television news than Democratic groups, with Enterprisers being most critical ...

"The optimistic Upbeats are among those least-likely to have unfavorable viewers of network news (6%), and a Democratic group, the Seculars, are among the network's biggest critics (18% unfavorable) ...

"Enterprisers are more than twice as likely to have an unfavorable opinion of Dan Rather (30%) than they are to give Brokaw (13%) or Jennings (12%) a negative rating" ...

Wait, There's More

The three-hour conclusion of "Poor Little Rich Girl: The Barbara Hutton Story" on NBC Tuesday night averaged an 18.5 national Nielsen rating and 30 percent of the audience between 8 and 11. The ABC lineup for those three hours did a 17.8/28, while CBS averaged 11.3/19 (Tuesday is usually a cinch ABC win) ...

Monday night, two hours of the premiere of "Poor" averaged a 21.3/33 (each rating point represents 886,000 TV homes)...

Four people in the Channel 5 newsroom -- none of them from the on-air staff, so far -- have been hit with chicken pox in the last week ...

Lorenzo Lamas has warned People magazine that he will sing on an upcoming episode of "Falcon Crest" ...

As viewers have probably noticed, Channel 7 is promoting -- during the November ratings sweeps, yet -- its "Magnum, P.I." reruns with a contest, six winners of which will actually appear in commercials for "Magnum" that will air during the February 1988 ratings sweeps ...

Contestants are asked to describe "why they enjoy watching Magnum weekdays at 4 p.m. in 100 words or less" ...

The station will select 25 of the "most creative and original entries" as finalists. Those 25 will then tape auditions, from which "a panel of celebrity judges" will choose the six, selected on the basis of "the originality, content and overall performance of their taped audition" ...

Hand-printed or typed entries must include name, address, age and daytime telephone number. Mail them to I Turn On Magnum, P.O. Box 311, Washington, D.C. 20044. Entries must be received by 5:30 p.m. Nov. 30. One entry per person; finalists will be notified by telephone by Dec. 10 ...

And Finally

David Corvo, executive producer of "CBS This Morning," and his wife, magazine writer Michele Willens, yesterday were celebrating the birth of their first child, 6-pound 14-ounce Lily Grace, born at a New York hospital Tuesday evening ...