Mikhail and Raisa Gorbachev apparently watch movies to unwind after busy days, and this week when they're back at the Soviet Embassy with their feet up after a hard day at the bargaining tables -- or tired from the Washington social whirl -- they can settle in for an evening of "The Princess Bride." That's just one of several films and videotapes the Motion Picture Association of America sent over to the embassy for the Gorbachevs to view during their summit visit here.

MPAA Vice President Barbara Dixon said the Soviet cultural attache', Alexander Potemkin, had called to request a 35-mm print of "Platoon" and a videocassette of "Gardens of Stone," both of which deal with the Vietnam war era. He also requested a broad selection of recent movies. In addition to "Platoon," the MPAA sent 35-mm prints of "Cry Freedom," the story of apartheid in South Africa, and "Princess Bride." In addition to "Gardens of Stone," cassettes sent to the embassy include "The Mission," "The Color of Money," "The Color Purple," "The Mosquito Coast," "The Karate Kid," " 'Round Midnight" and "Ghostbusters." Dixon said she specifically sent the fanciful, comical "Princess Bride" because she felt the Soviet leader would enjoy something light and fun after all the serious business of the day.

Out and About Jimmy and Gloria Stewart, in town for a series of events including the Kennedy Center Honors and the White House dinner for Gorbachev, will be returning to California this week with an addition to their family. When Stewart attended last week's National Press Foundation benefit showing of his classic film "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington," he was greeted by Virginia hunt country millionaire Betsy Cushing Roosevelt Whitney, who presented him with a Dom Perignon champagne case. Inside was a floppy-eared puppy called Harvey, the name of Stewart's invisible rabbit friend in the film of the same name. The Stewarts said they will be taking Harvey back to California to join their two golden retrievers. When Stewart first saw the box with air holes punched in it, he was genuinely concerned that it might contain a rabbit ...

The Gorbachevs had their first taste of America yesterday right after arriving at Andrews Air Force Base. They followed all the assembled dignitaries into the VIP lounge, where they were treated to some specially selected Muzak. It seemed that Capt. Page LaPrade, Andrews' chief of protocol, thought it might add to the occasion to have some Russian music played over the Muzak system. Al Smith, the owner of the Music by Muzak franchise here, seized the opportunity to rush out and buy cassettes of Russian folk music. The Gorbachevs will soon learn that in America, even a Soviet head of state can't be protected from elevator music ...

Poet James Dickey, novelist William Styron and the late anthropologist Joseph Campbell have been elected to the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Letters. The writers were each assigned one of the 50 chairs bearing a nameplate listing past and present occupants. Campbell died Oct. 31, after his election to the academy but before the announcement. Dickey will occupy Chair 15, previously held by Raphael Soyer, John Steinbeck and others. Styron will take Chair 28, most recently held by Lillian Hellman and Erskine Caldwell ...

Late-night talker Larry King is to be released tomorrow from New York Hospital, where he is listed in excellent condition after quintuple heart bypass surgery. King, who was operated on a week ago, said he expects to be back on the air early next month. He will spend the next few weeks recovering in New York and Florida. King said of all the calls and telegrams he has received, he most likes the one from New York Gov. Mario Cuomo, who wrote: "Only a quintuple! In my neighborhood the pharmacists perform operations like that" ...