There certainly was no way to miss the fact that much of the Soviet delegation was staying at the Madison Hotel during last week's summit. There were concrete barriers and security guards everywhere around the hotel, and even some men in long black leather trench coats, looking like something out of a bad spy movie. It was noticed, however, that the Soviet flag wasn't flying over the hotel entrance, as is usually the case when major foreign delegations are in residence there.

The lack of a flag wasn't meant as a slight. Marshall Coyne, the owner of the Madison, said the Soviet chief of protocol was contacted about flying a flag over the hotel entrance and said the only place where it should be displayed was where Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev was staying -- and that was at the Soviet Embassy on 16th Street. Out and About We got the date wrong for the memorial for Choo-San Goh, the gifted choreographer who died Nov. 28 of an AIDS-related illness. The tribute will be Jan. 5 -- not today -- at the Kennedy Center Terrace Theater. There will be no dancing at the memorial, because during his last days, Goh discussed the service with Washington Ballet Executive Director Elvie Moore and said he wanted it that way. Videotaped performances of some of his ballets will be shown at the memorial service for the Singapore-born choreographer, who created ballets for Mikhail Baryshnikov and several major ballet companies ...

In September, Mayor Marion Barry and New York Mayor Ed Koch delivered 30,000 keys to the South African consulate in New York to symbolize the people detained in South African jails. Today, another 30,000 keys from 20 states will be delivered to the South African Embassy here by Sen. Barbara Mikulski, Reps. William Gray, Pat Schroeder and Mervyn Dymally and D.C. Del. Walter Fauntroy. Some 20,000 post cards, addressed to South African President P.W. Botha, also will be presented to the embassy, urging Botha to "free South Africa's children" ...

Royal Watch: Sarah said she would do it and she did. Yesterday the duchess of York won her wings as a helicopter pilot, as she vowed to do on the eve of her wedding last year. Her husband Prince Andrew pinned the wings on her sweater during a ceremony at a Royal Air Force base in Oxfordshire and said, "I am constantly surprised by her." She won her license after 43 hours of instruction, and Andrew noted that it had taken him 85 hours of instruction to get his wings in a more complicated military chopper. Andrew flew a Royal Navy helicopter in combat during the 1982 Falkland Islands war. They were asked who would fly the craft if they found themselves in a helicopter together. But it isn't a problem: Fergie is a licensed civilian pilot and can't fly military aircraft; Andrew is qualified for military and can't legally fly civilian ...