Veteran broadcaster Daniel Schorr has become a bit of a celebrity around National Public Radio now that he has appeared on stage with rock star Frank Zappa. Zappa has called Schorr in the past to discuss possible television projects in which Schorr would discuss news events of the week with Zappa and his band. The projects never got off the ground, but the two became friends.

When Zappa was in town last week appearing at the Warner Theatre and conducting a voter registration drive, he asked Schorr to make an appeal from the stage on the importance of voting. At the theater, Zappa asked Schorr if he would like to sing a number, and unable to pass up that opportunity, Schorr decided on Gershwin's "It Ain't Necessarily So," although he was afraid the band wouldn't know the music. But the band came through, and the audience seemed to love it, Schorr said yesterday; some people even asked him for autographs. To add to his newfound fame, his NPR colleague Susan Stamberg played a tape of Schorr's performance Sunday on "Weekend Edition." Out and About

Walter H. Annenberg, former ambassador to the Court of St. James's, certainly must have loved his old prep school. The founder of TV Guide has donated $10 million to the Peddie School in Hightstown, N.J., from which he graduated in 1927. The donation brings the total of Annenberg's gifts to Peddie to $30 million ...

It's probably not surprising that relatives of the two Irish women killed last year in a head-on car crash with Matthew Broderick describe the actor's $175 fine Monday for reckless driving as "a travesty of justice." John Gallagher, whose wife and mother-in-law died in the Aug. 5 wreck in Northern Ireland, said yesterday that it was "incredible" that the more serious charge of death by careless driving had been dropped. Broderick, the star of "War Games" and "Ferris Bueller's Day Off," was vacationing with his girlfriend, "Dirty Dancing" star Jennifer Grey, at the time of the accident. He spent a month in the hospital with a fractured leg, and Grey suffered minor injuries ...

Royal Watch: If there isn't enough speculation about the marriage of Charles and Diana, one British author is suggesting that if the prince's uncle Lord Mountbatten had lived, another woman might now be his wife. Penny Junor, author of an upcoming biography titled "Charles," writes that at the time of his death in a 1979 Irish Republican Army bombing, Mountbatten was working to arrange a marriage between his granddaughter Lady Amanda Knatchbull and Charles. Mountbatten was like a second father to Charles, and, in an excerpt from the book in McCall's magazine, Junor writes, "It is doubtful that anything would have come of {Charles and Amanda's} relationship, but had Lord Mountbatten been alive when Lady Diana came on the scene, there is a good chance that he would have warned against the marriage" ...

As his latest film "School Daze" opens to a barrage of praise and criticism, Spike Lee took the unusual step last night of speaking to the people the movie is about: college students. Lee joined actors Ossie Davis and Tisha Campbell in an unusual two-hour video teleconference, originating from Howard University, that reached 250 campuses. When asked at one point about his movie's emphasis on the partying aspect of fraternities, Lee countered, "I never knew anybody who studied during Homecoming Week." The crowd at Howard roared in agreement ...

Fathers never seem to get the proper respect. Washington filmmaker Hal Weiner was playing golf with his son Andrew last weekend at the Rock Creek Public Golf Course when he lost control of his golf cart on the long sloping hill approaching the 17th hole. He splashed unceremoniously into an ice-covered pond. As he sat in the cold water watching his clubs and the cart sink, his son Andrew walked up and asked politely whether his father would mind if he played through. Weiner was wondering yesterday whether he should file a claim for his lost golf clubs under his homeowner's policy or his automobile insurance. What he said to his son was not reported ...