The Washington Herald, that feisty new weekly of gossip, chatter and social Washington, is "temporarily" suspending publication with this week's issue. David Adler, the founder, editor and publisher of the tabloid, has made the move after a six-month test market run, and he's planning to go out and look for bigger chunks of money to make his idea work.

Adler, the cofounder and publisher of Dossier magazine, which his family sold two years ago, said he had determined that the newspaper could not succeed with its present free-distribution circulation of 30,000. To make a go of it, he said, The Herald needs a circulation of at least 100,000 and must be printed in four-color process. Adler said his goal is still to make The Herald a daily publication covering the main business of Washington -- government, politics and society -- the way the entertainment world is covered by Daily Variety in Los Angeles. "We'll be back," he said yesterday. "The future is in these types of publications like Roll Call and even the Uptown Citizen. It takes a lot of money and time, but it can be done."

Out and About Washington actor Robert Prosky was in the opening-night audience at the Folger Shakespeare Theatre last night to see another member of his family tread the boards. Prosky, who starred in many Arena Stage productions and most recently was the roll call sergeant on "Hill Street Blues," was in the theater with his wife Ida to see their 23-year-old son Andrew debut there in "Macbeth," playing the role of Donalbain. The production will be at the Folger through April 10 ...

It was another of those Capitol Hill moving-on parties. This time longtime Hill aide Ira Shapiro was leaving after 12 years to go to the Washington law firm of Winthrop, Stimson, Putnam & Roberts. Shapiro, chief of staff for Sen. Jay Rockefeller since the West Virginia Democrat came to the Senate three years ago, has also worked for Sen. Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) and former senators Gaylord Nelson and Tom Eagleton, and was minority staff director of the Senate Government Affairs Committee. Among the guests at last week's party in the Dirksen Building were Sens. Rockefeller, Carl Levin (D-Mich.), Dale Bumpers (D-Ark.), Bob Graham (D-Fla.), John Danforth (R-Mo.), Paul Sarbanes (D-Md.) and Max Baucus (D-Mont.) and former senators Charles Percy and Nelson ...

It's a milestone year for two towering actors. Sir John Mills, the elegant British actor who won an Oscar for his performance as the Hunchback in "Ryan's Daughter," turned 80 yesterday. And Jimmy Stewart, who is as American as a Norman Rockwell painting, will turn 80 May 20. Stewart was honored Sunday with a lifetime achievement award at the Monterey Film Festival. Stewart's classic "It's a Wonderful Life" was released in a computer-colorized version last year, and the actor was asked what he thought of the new process. "Colorization is one of the most disgraceful things that ever happened in any endeavor in this country," he answered with uncharacteristic harshness. "I hope the people who perpetrate this on others go flat broke some day soon. The actors end up with orange faces. The cameraman took all this time, all this time to create depth and to cast the right shadows. With colorization, people just walk around, just walk around like painted Easter eggs" ...

This will make you feel old. Superman will turn 50 next Monday, and his bosses at D.C. Comics will be throwing a birthday bash Friday in Manhattan. And CBS will air a one-hour television special on the real birthday. Superman, a k a Clark Kent, worked with Lois Lane and Jimmy Olsen in the city called Metropolis, but New Yorkers knew it was really their town, even if Cleveland started out as the strip's model. That city plans a ticker-tape parade and the unveiling of a Superman statue this summer ...