In an unusual turn of events in the ever-changing Trump-the-Divorce story, Ivana Trump's lawyer called a news conference yesterday to announce that his client had been married once before for the "sole purpose" of arranging her emigration from Czechoslovakia. Michael Kennedy said that in November 1971, Ivana, then a 22-year-old model and skier, married a 25-year-old Austrian skiing friend, Alfred Winklmayr, in Prague. This "Cold War marriage," he said, "was never consummated" and the couple never lived together. "She wanted her freedom" from the communist regime, Kennedy explained.

In outlining the chronology, Kennedy said Ivana received an Austrian passport in March 1972 and emigrated to Canada in September 1972. There, after a mandatory waiting period, the marriage was "dissolved" in August 1973. She married the then-millionaire, now-billionaire developer Donald Trump in 1977. Kennedy said Trump has always known about Ivana's first husband, although their three children did not. In explaining why this bit of information was being volunteered at this time, Kennedy said Ivana has never hidden the prior marriage but that he was making the announcement to diffuse "inaccurate" reports about Winklmayr in the British press. There is obviously still much more to come on this story. Kennedy refused to comment on why Ivana has not yet filed for divorce, saying only that there is still hope for a reconciliation.

Out and About

When Barbara Bush stops by a Washington hotel for lunch, everyone gets excited and fusses. The First Lady stopped by the Four Seasons Hotel's Aux Beaux Champs restaurant yesterday to have lunch with a longtime friend, former chief of protocol Selwa Roosevelt. At the stiffly elegant Four Seasons, the new general manager, Stan Bromley, was appropriately excited but decided to take a different tack. Known as a hustling hotelier with a sense of humor at a hotel that takes itself too seriously, Bromley decided he didn't want to bother the First Lady with the usual obsequious fussing she has to endure. He decided instead to do something for Millie, the most popular resident of the White House. He went to the nearby chichi pet boutique -- the Bone Jour Cafe -- and bought a doggie strand of faux pearls with a dangling gold bone and left it in a gift box in the First Lady's limo with a note: "As the proud father of three humane society mutts, this gift is for Millie." Maybe the next time we see the famous springer spaniel at one of her usual photo ops, she, like her mistress, will be wearing a subtle but elegant strand of pearls ...

Maestro Mstislav Rostropovich was back in his adopted American homeland last night, winning praise from the president and acclaim from a White House audience after a triumphant concert tour that took him to his native Soviet Union last week for the first time after a 16-year exile. The National Symphony Orchestra artistic director was dubbed a "national treasure" by President Bush, with nodding assent from Soviet Ambassador Yuri Dubinin. After leading a dozen cellists in a brief East Room concert, Slava Rostropovich fell into an animated conversation -- in Russian -- with Dubinin at a reception the Bushes gave in the maestro's honor. NSO musicians and supporters were among the 270 guests ...

Tonight's fancy American Institute of Architects dinner for Prince Charles at the National Building Museum may also benefit some of the city's homeless. Any unserved portions of the smoked salmon, beef tenderloin and vegetables have been promised to the D.C. Central Kitchen, a pickup service that distributes leftover food to 32 shelter and feeding programs for the homeless. In the kitchen's first year, Executive Director Robert Egger has picked up more than 40 tons of food including 300 hot dogs after every Redskins home game, 225 gallons of Steve's Ice Cream when the Dupont Circle branch closed, and a few exotic offerings -- shrimp creole for 300, five bags of coconuts, 12 suckling pigs and five dressed deer ...

Producer Joseph Papp announced yesterday that "A Chorus Line," the longest-running show in Broadway history, will finally come to a close March 31 because of dwindling ticket sales. The musical, which won a Pulitzer Prize in 1976 , will close after a record 6,104 performances ...