To nearly all the justices on the Supreme Court, the televising of court sessions is something to be avoided at all costs. Years ago there was a similar feeling on the part of many members of Congress about television in those hallowed chambers, but most hardly notice it now that it's there. Justice William Brennan Jr., who is an exception on the court, thinks televising Supreme Court sessions is inevitable. "I would love it. I'm the only one presently of the nine," he concedes in an interview in the June issue of Irish America magazine, "who would allow television broadcasts of our actual proceedings."

Brennan, who turned 84 last month, says he has no intention of retiring or slowing down after 33 years on the bench. He said bluntly: "Retirement for me is no consideration. I would not know what to do with myself that would give me ... the satisfaction I get here staying in the court."

Out and About

n a different way of observing Memorial Day, Veterans Affairs Secretary Edward Derwinski is to host a dinner honoring seven recipients of the congressional Medal of Honor today at the McPherson Grill. The honorees are Maj. Gen. Patrick H. Brady of Fort Belvoir; Col. James P. Fleming, Maguire Air Force Base, N.J.; Col. Robert F. Foley, Fairfax; Col. Wesley L. Fox, Quantico; Ronald E. Ray, Arlington, Veterans Affairs assistant secretary; Lt. Michael Thornton, Norfolk; and Brian M. Thacker, Wheaton, Veterans Affairs executive assistant. Among the guests expected are Gen. Colin Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Gen. Richard Stilwell, chairman of the Korean Veterans Memorial, and Jan Scruggs, founder and president of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund ...

Hospital Report: Harmon Killebrew, baseball Hall of Famer and one-time Washington Senator, is in Scottsdale Memorial Hospital in Arizona with a collapsed lung after surgery for a ruptured ulcer in his stomach. The 53-year-old Killebrew is expected to be hospitalized for another 10 days. In addition to the Washington Senators, Killebrew played for the Minnesota Twins and the Kansas City Royals in his 22-year major league career, during which he hit 573 home runs ...

It's a good thing Barbara Bush doesn't have Nancy Reagan's fascination with astrology: The upcoming summit isn't astrologically harmonious. At least that's what Joan Quigley, White House astrologer to the Reagans, says. Quigley, who claims she set the takeoff times for Ronald Reagan's jet, the timing of his meetings with Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev and the scheduling of White House news conferences, now says that President Bush and Gorbachev "will not see eye to eye in the way Reagan and Gorbachev did, or get along as harmoniously." The stars also tell her that agreements agreed to may not later be agreed to, or something like that. Alas! It's probably too late to call off the summit. Quigley does have a prediction from the stars for Reagan and his Monday breakfast meeting with Gorbachev in San Francisco. Reagan might not be feeling well at the time, she says, adding that he might even have a small accident on a short journey. But if the meeting takes place, Gorbachev will be glad to see Reagan and the old chemistry between them will be unchanged, she predicts. Quigley's recent book, incidentally, is still in the bookstores... .