Cable News Network's principal Washington anchor, Bernard Shaw, is returning as co-anchor of the 8 p.m. weeknight "Primenews" starting next Monday, reuniting him with Atlanta-based Lou Waters ...

Waters's previous co-anchor, Susan Rook, moves to weekend anchor ...

The switch in assignments means Shaw has dropped his role on "The International Hour," which he has co-anchored with Ralph Wenge. No replacement for Shaw on the afternoon show has been named ...

The very busy Bernie also continues as co-anchor, with Catherine Crier, of the one-hour weeknight "The World Today" at 6 ...

Shaw previously co-anchored "Primenews" with Waters and Mary Alice Williams from 1982 until last year, when "The World Today" began its run ...

While we're on the CNN beat:

Turner Broadcasting System Inc. boss Ted Turner spent the weekend in Cuba talking to his old fishing buddy Fidel Castro ...

As a result, his interview with the Cuban chief of state, "A Conversation With Fidel Castro," is slated to air on CNN the night of June 25, preempting "Larry King Live" that Monday evening ...

Turner will be on CNN's "Crossfire" program tonight at 7:30 with Patrick Buchanan and Michael Kinsley discussing his Cuba visit. The show was taped here yesterday ...

NBC News was first on the air yesterday at 1:42 p.m. with a report on the John Poindexter sentencing. CBS News quickly followed at 1:43 and the others were on within minutes ...

Along the Ratingzzz RialtoFriday night, WJLA's local special, "Seven Salutes Seven Who Care," between 9 and 10, averaged a 5.5 local Nielsen rating and an 11 percent audience share. Each local ratings point represents 17,271 TV homes ...

Also on Friday, "Are You Kidding?" on CBS averaged a 4.9 national Nielsen rating and an 11 percent audience share. Each national ratings point represents 921,000 TV homes ...

Saturday night, in the 24 big city Nielsen overnight ratings, CBS's "Beauty and the Beast" returned to the schedule with barely a growl -- averaging only 4.6/9. Meanwhile, the debut of NBC's "Singer & Sons" at 9:30 averaged a 13.4/26 during the last half-hour of "Beast" ...

Locally, "Beauty and the Beast" went paws up on Channel 9 on Saturday, averaging only a 4.4/9, while "Singer & Sons" on Four averaged an 11.3/23 ...

The annual Public Broadcasting Service convention gets underway in Dallas next week and already they have something to talk about ...

A gossip item in the influential Electronic Media yesterday, heralded by a page-wide headline "PBS programmer threatens to quit," claimed that Jennifer Lawson, executive vice president of national programming and promotions services, is threatening to leave because "she still hasn't been told what her exact role is, even though she's been on the job for seven months ...

"She also warned," EM continued, "that she believed she should be making broad program funding decisions and if public TV officials don't give her those powers she says 'I'll be job-hunting' " ...

Yesterday, from her Crystal City headquarters, Lawson issued a statement calling the report in EM's weekly "The Insider" column "definitely 'outside' the realm of truth in reporting I threatened to quit PBS. An EM reporter misunderstood remarks I made about my role as chief programming executive at PBS. I have a clearly defined role and I have no intention of leaving, particularly when the system is at the start of a new and exciting decade" ...

Behind the misunderstanding is the fact that PBS has yet to come up with a plan for its national Program Service and so Lawson, who had the top programming job at the Corporation for Public Broadcasting before her PBS appointment, is still waiting for a precise definition of what she will be responsible for at the public network. In short, no plan, no chance yet to make broad program funding decisions ...

The plan to be considered at the upcoming convention, in the words of one PBS executive, "notes that the concept of the Station Program Cooperative" -- the system that's been in effect for years in which stations bid repeatedly on national programming they want to see on the yearly PBS schedule -- "is inconsistent with the concept of a strong chief program executive, and recommends replacing the SPC with a program fund aggregated by direct assessment of the stations. Lawson considers this change crucial to her ability to carry out the mandate she's been given" ...

Capitalism will be explained to the Soviets this fall when "Adam Smith's Money World," public television's weekly look at business, starts its run on Soviet television, dubbed in Russian ...

In interviews published today in the New York Times, the show's host, whose real name is George J.W. Goodman, and his Soviet colleagues said much of the information presented on the program would be beyond the typical Soviet viewer's comprehension ...

Co Star, a Soviet joint venture company that produces and distributes films, will get the broadcast rights to "Money World," and will sell advertising time to U.S. companies doing business in the Soviet Union, including General Motors and AT&T ...

In return, the show's U.S. producers, Alvin H. Perlmutter Inc. and public TV station WNET, will get technical support for a public television special on perestroika and glasnost, as well as for segments of "Adam Smith's Money World" ...

And ABC News president Roone Arledge announced yesterday that ABC News, in conjunction with Gostelradio, the Soviet national broadcast company, and NHK -- the public broadcasting network in Japan -- will join libraries and production facilities to create a pictorial history of the 20th century ...

The first product of the joint effort should be aired within three years, according to a network spokesman ...

Said Arledge: "With the cooperation of an international panel of historians and the depth of material available from three perspectives, we will be able to provide the definitive story of our time for all the world to see ...

"We will build a resource that will last well beyond this decade -- and there is a feeling among us that it is appropriate that the technologies developed in this century create the archives that preserve it" ...

The agreements cover "not only programs to be broadcast on over-the-air television but also separately developed programs for cable television series; interactive disks; cassette histories; books; computer programs; and whatever other forms of communication become available in the rapidly changing technology of all the countries involved" ...

And "NBC Nightly News With Tom Brokaw" will air a special five-part series on the reunification of East and West Germany during the week of June 25. The series, called "The Fourth Reich," will be reported by correspondent Mike Boettcher. Economic and monetary unification of the two Germanys will take place on July 1 ...

Oops!Captain Airwaves' abacus (it's been in the family for years) dropped a few beads Sunday afternoon, which is why NBC's "Today" show suddenly (and incorrectly) seemed to project a loss of $100 million in revenue for this calendar year in yesterday's TV Column ...

The projected loss on "Today" is actually a lot closer to $10 million (up-front ad purchases by the big sponsors for the fourth quarter could change that too) for the network. That's about 10 percent off last year's revenues of nearly $100 million for the show ...

However, since local NBC stations get to keep the revenues from the first and third half-hours of the program (which makes "Today" a very big favorite with NBC affiliates), the drop in audiences is hitting them for probably another $10 million too. Which adds up to a total loss of at least $20 million so far ...

Non-network sources think the losses of the network and the stations together could be closer to $30 million before the year is up, should the current ratings loss by "Today" continue ...

Airwaves' errant abacus aside, NBC has experienced a $200 million shortfall in projected revenues (from $700 down to $500 million) for the year but the first $100 million is due to audience falloff for all programs on the schedule. Not just "Today" ...

Some of the beads rolled under those piles of old National Geographics in Airwaves' Pigpen yesterday and since the cleaning crews absolutely -- and quite correctly -- refuse to vacuum in there until he straightens things up, the chances are pretty good that for the time being he'll have to use a pocket calculator, just like everybody else, when he tries to figure out things like ratingzzz averages and revenue losses, which should relieve a lot of anxiety in network suites all over Manhattan this morning ...

In Other NewsSorry, "CBS This Morning." Captain Airwaves (still a little dizzy from a prolonged bead search) says he doesn't like those "Oh, What a Beautiful Morning" promos launched last week ...

The network has the rights to the song for a whole year. Airwaves thinks the pictures are pretty but hopes they can coax vocalist Bobby Arvon into recording some other versions of the old war horse from "Oklahoma!" -- maybe next time a little closer to the spirit of the original ...

On the other hand, Airwaves thinks that "CBS This Morning" takes a step forward by signing Alexandra Penney, editor in chief of Self magazine, to do a weekly segment about men, every Tuesday ...

The author of "How to Keep Your Man Monogamous" starts a week from today ...

One more "CBS This Morning" item. A spokesman for CBS News says the program beat NBC's "Today" in the huge New York market for the first time ever in the May ratings sweeps. Though not by much. "This" averaged a 2.4 local rating and a 12 share on WCBS; "Today" did a 2.2/11 on WNBC ...