LOS ANGELES -- Jane Pauley fans -- and Washington certainly seems to have its share -- will be happy to know that the first of her "Real Life With Jane Pauley" specials for NBC on Tuesday night probably earned a spot in next week's Top Ten ...

"Real Life" averaged a 13.3 national Nielsen rating and a 25 percent audience share in the 10 p.m. timeslot, outscoring the last hour of the Kenny Rogers rerun movie "The Gambler III" on CBS, which did a 10.3/19, and a rerun of "thirtysomething" on ABC, which did a 6.9/13 ...

In Washington, Jane did an 11.2/23 on Channel 4, almost double the competition. "Thirtysomething" averaged a 6.5/13 on Seven, and "The Gambler" rolled a 6.0/12 snake eyes on Nine ...

(Need we remind you, from 3,000 miles west, that each national ratings point represents 921,000 TV homes, while a local point stands for 17,278 households? What's that? Go jump in the wading pool?) ...

Regardless. The initial good showing should jolly well cheer up Jane, who has been a little skeptical about just what all those magazine cover stories and popularity polls she's been on lately really represent, Nielsenwise ...

If the five-show series does well through the rest of the summer, Jane could eventually get a primetime slot, perhaps by early next year ...

Jane met with the TV press out here on Tuesday, but her press conference came just before the suddenly rescheduled appearance of NBC president Bob Wright and the anticipation that he was about to announce something big (like a promotion for Brandon Tartikoff), which took a little off the occasion (to say nothing of the subsequent coverage of her press conference) ...

She was funny, self-deprecating and uncharacteristically revved-up -- she caught herself babbling at least twice, at one point interrupting herself to say, "if I can continue this monologue" -- as she tried to explain what she and executive producer David Browning were trying to do ...

And no, what she's trying to do on "Real Life" does not involve a 100 percent commitment to just plain folks. After some nudging, she finally confessed that she has "invitations out to a couple of very well known and successful people in the entertainment field" to appear on a future program -- and after such a nice, blue-collar start too! ...

Moving Right Along Major departure at the Cable News Network bureau in Washington, where Randy Douthit did not renew his contract. At one recent point in his long career at CNN, he was executive producer of "Crossfire," "The Capital Gang" and "Larry King Live" all at the same time ...

Michael Linder, the controversial executive producer who first got Channel 5's "America's Most Wanted" off the ground but was eventually dropped, has been signed as executive producer for "The Jesse Jackson Show" ...

He will share executive producing credit with Quincy Jones, whose Quincy Jones Entertainment Co. is producing the weekly one-hour syndicated show in association with Jesse L. Jackson Productions ...

In a statement, Jones said, "Michael Linder is among the most innovative producers of television in our business today and, with his guidance, I have no double that we will set a new standard for public affairs television" ...

Former CBS News president Van Gordon Sauter will serve as executive consultant for the series, which debuts in September and will be produced weekly out of the Channel 4 studios in Washington ...

We've tested the waters here poolside, and we know you will be fascinated to learn that "ABC World News Tonight With Peter Jennings" averaged a 9.4/20 last week, compared with an 8.5/19 for "CBS Evening News With Dan Rather" and a 7.8/17 for "NBC Nightly News With Tom Brokaw" ...

Poolside, we've heard that Brokaw is pretty upset with the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences, which came out this week with its annual nominations for Emmys in news and documentaries and completely ignored Tom's NBC News special from the Berlin Wall the night the wall came tumbling down ...

An ABC News special about the wall, which wasn't nearly so current, according to NBC News, was nominated, making Tom all the madder (if it's any consolation, Big Guy, News Emmys are considered important only by the people who finally win one of them -- NATAS and the networks never have figured out a good, fair system for the awards) ...

If you're still awake, CBS led the nominations announced this week with 37, followed by PBS at 27; ABC, 22; TBS, 12; NBC, 11; Fox, 5; syndicated programs, 3; HBO 3, MTV, 2; and A&E, Discovery and CNN, each with 1 ...

(Another charm of the annual news Emmy competitions is NATAS's refusal to tell us when the prizes are going to be handed out) ...

And Finally The Language Problem, which surfaced on this tour when TV critics heard a 6-year-old girl kick off the pilot of CBS's new fall series "Uncle Buck" with the word "suck," is being laid at Fox Broadcasting's door by rival network executives ...

Both CBS Broadcast Group president Howard Stringer and NBC president Robert Wright feel that the success of Fox shows like "The Simpsons," "Married ... With Children" and "In Living Color" has pushed the boundaries, and that in turn has caused ABC, NBC and CBS series producers to try the limits of network broadcast standards departments once again ...

All three networks had adopted comparatively "risk-free" programming schedules last season in the wake of complaints during 1988-89 when NBC, in particular, had a couple of shows, including a Geraldo Rivera special on devil worship, that stirred the critics ...

Stringer said this week that it was Fox's success in creating "niche programming" with "harsh-edged reality" series that pushed the edge of the envelope further ...

"We at CBS could not have put 'Married ... With Children' on the air when it started," Stringer said. "And now, of course, we could put it on the air ... and no one would give us any particular grief."

He promised that the language in "Uncle Buck" will be closely watched, but added, "The message we're sending out here is, we're getting back into the comedy business... . the inventiveness and the energy and the aggression in which producers are allowed to work with us -- have to be given a sort of open throttle ...

"We're sending a signal out to producers that we want to give you the chance to push and expand" ...

Wright pointed to the fact that the smaller Fox network is made up of independent stations, some of them new, which he said also contributes to the "different standard" under which Fox operates ...

"The community view of programming at the CBS and the NBC or the ABC affiliate," said Wright, "is different and more -- the expectations are different than they are at the Fox station" ...

The Fox stations, he added, "don't do news, by and large. They don't have a lot of community service or public affairs. And their image in the community is kind of flashy entertainment to begin with. So they're not a bad fit for that issue. Not for us, though" ...