Super-successful medical malpractice lawyer Jack Olender, a man who likes to see his name in print, sent a letter yesterday to U.S. Attorney Jay Stephens saying it's not too late to plea-bargain the Marion Barry case, and offering himself as a mediator to the deal. Olender, who doesn't think Stephens will win the trial, said his letter was based on his poll of members of the local Trial Lawyers Association. He sent 200 questionnaires out Wednesday and 71 lawyers responded.

With the Barry case going to the jury this week, Olender said his unscientific survey shows that 52 percent of the lawyers believe Barry will be acquitted of the perjury charges or there will be a hung jury. And 35 percent expect either "not guilty" or a hung jury on the drug counts. Olender, who has achieved some local fame by annually presenting the $25,000 Olender Peacemaker Award to major world figures, said this is the second time he has written Stephens. On July 17 he sent a letter advising a plea bargain agreement in which the charges would be reduced to a misdemeanor, without jail. Stephens did not respond. Olender said yesterday that he does not find it audacious to add his two cents to the troubling, complex trial, saying, "There is nothing to gain even with a guilty verdict. It's a dinky case blown out of proportion that is creating racial distrust and hatred in the city." Out and About

Few criticisms ever stuck to President Reagan. One that did was the term "Teflon president." Rep. Patricia Schroeder says she believes she was the first to use the phrase to describe her amazement at how Reagan could get away with things no one else could. Appearing on the "Fox Morning News," the Colorado Democrat has now come up with a derisive term for President Bush, the man she sees as all cosmetics: the "Revlon president" ...

There may be 15 or more groups traveling around the country calling themselves the Ink Spots, after the famous close-harmony singing sensation of the 1930s and 1940s, but Herb Kenny, a Columbia resident, says he is the only one left from the original Decca Records group. He was the deep bass voice of such hits as "Gypsy" and "To Each His Own." The 73-year-old Kenny, who still sings in the Columbia area, said yesterday that he plans to begin touring again. He dropped by Anton's 1201 Club Saturday and sang a number with the Persuasions, an a cappella group performing there. He was the guest of WDCU announcer Tim Masters, who said he met Kenny after the singer called one evening to thank him for playing Ink Spots records. Masters, excited about meeting Kenny, decided to take him to Anton's for an evening, where he received a standing ovation from an audience that undoubtedly thought all the Ink Spots were gone ...

Marla Maples can't seem to give her money away. She said she wanted to give part of her earnings from her No Excuses jeans commercials to environmental groups. She offered a $25,000 donation to the Friends of the Earth, and the organization has rejected it. Nothing personal, and nothing to do with the blonde's noted relationship with Donald Trump, a spokesman for the Friends says: "Our board has said we cannot put our name alongside any commercial project." Maybe she can offer it to Trump. He isn't known as an environmentalist, but he does seem to be having money problems ...