Pennsylvania State University's Center for the Performing Arts has become the third college to reject a National Endowment for the Arts grant because of the endowment's anti-obscenity clause. At issue was a $5,000 grant. In a letter to the NEA, Kenneth Foster, director of the center, said that although the center has never promoted obscenity, he is opposed to the restrictions enacted by Congress last year prohibiting the use of NEA funds for works considered obscene. "To place content restrictions on artists is to restrict artistic output. Only governmental regimes of the most oppressive sort engage in this practice," he said.

Since the anti-obscenity clause has been in effect, the University of Iowa has rejected a $12,000 grant and Gettysburg College has turned down a $4,500 grant. Other rejections have come from the New York and Oregon Shakespeare festivals, which refused grants of about $50,000 each.

Out and About

It's a frightening thought to consider, but if a spy wants to know if some major international crisis is going on, all he has to do is hang out at a couple of key Domino's Pizza parlors. At least that's what Frank Meeks, president of Domino's Washington franchises, says. He has made the same claim during other international crises and he contends that since about 72 hours before Saddam Hussein's invasion of Kuwait, pizza sales at his outlets that service the White House, the Pentagon, the State Department and the CIA have been doing a booming business. He said the night before President Bush decided to send in the troops was a near-record pizza-eaters night. So if you happen to notice sinister-looking men in trench coats counting pizza deliveries, don't worry about it, it's probably only some spy hard at work ...

Palimony lawyer Marvin Mitchelson isn't all that well loved, but that seems to have changed now that he represents lawsuits against Roseanne Barr and Andrew Dice Clay. He is representing Barr's ex-husband, Bill Pentland, and Clay's ex-wife, Kathy Swanson. Mitchelson is actually receiving fan mail. "I never got so many 'go get them,' 'best wishes against the gruesome twosome' messages," he said ...

Donald Trump may have some serious financial problems, but you wouldn't know it to hear him talk about it. "It's good for me to be thought of as poor right now," he says in the September Vanity Fair. "You wouldn't believe some of the deals I am making... . I've really enjoyed the last few weeks." And, with unabashed hubris, he contends that in spite of his bad press, he is more popular than ever and that popularity has helped the two women in his life -- his estranged wife, Ivana, and the other woman, Marla Maples. "I've made a lot of satellites ... whether it's Marla or Ivana. Marla can do any movie she wants to now. Ivana can do whatever she wants" ...

Hot young actor Charlie Sheen has checked into a drug and alcohol rehabilitation center for a month. A spokesman for the 24-year-old son of actor Martin Sheen wouldn't say where the center is or identify what kind of problem Sheen has. He would only say the actor is suffering from "extreme exhaustion due to the arduous filming schedule of four features back-to-back" ...

"Given what's grabbin' 'em these days, it's chancy. This isn't 'Die Hard 3.' We don't have a 30-ton truck that crashes through a brick wall, mows down a row of fruit stands and winds up on top of a 3-month-old infant. But what the hell, in whatever I do I like to feel I've got a little gamble going." -- Jack Nicholson, in Life magazine, on the prospects for the film "The Two Jakes," which he directed and stars in ...