One evening when Lyndon Johnson was vice president, he stopped by the Monocle, Capitol Hill's long-established watering hole, and was annoyed when he was told no tables were available. He had restaurant owner Connie Valanos ask over the public address system whether someone would be willing to give up his table for the vice president. When it became apparent there were no volunteers, Johnson stormed out of the restaurant and never returned.

That, according to Monocle manager John Valanos, is just one of many stories from the 30 years the restaurant has fed Capitol Hill types. John F. Kennedy, for one, had roast beef sandwiches delivered to the White House, and a more recent visitor, Supreme Court nominee David Souter, ate there two nights in a row with Sen. Warren Rudman at Chief Justice William Rehnquist's favorite table. Throughout this week, the Monocle is observing its 30th anniversary by donating 20 percent of the dinner receipts to the House and Senate Day Care Centers. And to help raise money, such regulars as Sens. Ted Stevens, Dennis DeConcini, John Kerry and Alan Dixon will put in some time bartending.

Out and About James Caan, best known for his role as the hot-headed Sonny Corleone in "The Godfather," has married for the third time. On Sunday, the 49-year-old actor married Ingrid Hajek, 29, on a yacht called the "Regentsea," which is docked in Marina del Rey outside Los Angeles. Caan's 14-year-old son, Scott, was best man. Hajek has been married once before ...

Eager to take advantage of the meeting of the superpowers in Finland, the Finnish government printed up 3,000 official summit T-shirts and 3,000 official summit umbrellas for the weekend. Unfortunately Gorbachev's name was misspelled as "Gorbatchev." Foreign Ministry spokesman Christer Haglund said the government apologized and considered recalling the whole batch of souvenirs, "but we thought, 'what the heck?' " ...

Last month the movie "Pretty Woman," starring Richard Gere and Julia Roberts, became the highest grossing film in the Disney company's history. Garry Marshall, who directed the movie, jokes in the current People magazine: "Walt Disney is saying somewhere in his grave, ' "Pinocchio," no ... a nice duck, no, it has to be a hooker as my highest-grossing picture' " ...