Washington Post reporter Caryle Murphy, who spent 26 days reporting from secret locations in Kuwait after Iraqi soldiers invaded the Persian Gulf nation on Aug. 2, will be one of four women to receive Courage in Journalism Awards. The new awards, which include $5,000 for each recipient, were created by the International Women's Media Foundation (IWMF) for women journalists who have demonstrated "extraordinary bravery and dedication to pursuing their craft under difficult or dangerous circumstances." The awards will be presented at a dinner Nov. 11 at the National Museum of Women in the Arts. The dinner will be part of a three-day IWMF meeting that will include 100 journalists representing more than 45 countries.

The other winners are Maria Jimena Duzan of Colombia, who according to the IWMF board "frequently faced the dangers of writing about drugs in her country as a correspondent for the newspaper El Espectador"; Florica Ichim of Romania, who is reporting from hiding for Romania's largest opposition newspaper, Romania Libera; and Lilyanne Pierre Paul of Haiti, a correspondent for Radio Haiti who was an outspoken critic of the Duvalier regime and subsequent Haitian governments. She has been arrested, imprisoned and exiled for a time in the course of her work. Out and About The talk around town is that CIA Director William Webster, often on the short list of the most eligible unmarried men in town, is about to change that status. Webster is reportedly planning an Oct. 20 wedding with Lynda Jo Clugstone at the National Presbyterian Church. Clugstone, who has worked for the Willard Hotel and the Four Seasons Hotel in Boston, is currently the head of marketing at the Watergate Hotel ...

There are some political decisions that can come back to haunt you. Washington restaurateur and Marion Barry political supporter Jeff Gildenhorn has moved his well-known Fishery a couple of doors down the block on Connecticut Avenue in Chevy Chase, D.C., and in the process is without a liquor license because of some legal complications. Late last week when Gildenhorn explained to a couple at his restaurant that he couldn't serve hard drinks because his license hadn't been renewed yet, they turned to leave and one of them grumbled, "That's what you get for supporting Marion Barry" ...

Country singer Loretta Lynn has said she is going to join forces with Barbara Bush to fight illiteracy because she remembers her frustration over not being able to read the Bible when she was a teenager. Lynn, the inspiration for the Academy Award-winning movie "Coal Miner's Daughter," said she is going to do a video with the First Lady and record two songs to raise money for the literacy program. "When I was 17 years old I would hold the Bible and cry because I couldn't read it," she said. "Today, the Bible is the easiest thing for me to read." She said she would like to take the First Lady back to Kentucky to visit some of the small schools there ...

"I heard a wonderful thing just the other day. An American radio station thought it might start putting on plays, and they hired a market research outfit to find out what was the best time to put out a play on the radio, and after conducting a lot of interviews, they came back with the answer: 1936. Society is permanently on the skids." -- Playwright Tom Stoppard in Fame magazine ...